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Notes from Around the Web: Fifth Gaza Edition

I will be really, really happy when I no longer have to post these “special editions.”

In the meantime, here’s the latest:

Voices from Sderot provides insights into what life is like in that terrorized place along the Gaza border.
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Thank you, Rabbi Marvin Hier, for expressing so clearly, cogently, and accurately how Israel faces “a double standard,” and why this is not only unfair but also deeply frightening, in the Wall Street Journal.
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Yes, I know the New York Times believes it does a good job showing “balance” in its coverage on what’s happening in Gaza. But sometimes, it really doesn’t seem that way. So I’m grateful to see things evening out somewhat this week, with this article on Israelis’ support for their government’s action, by Ethan Bronner, and this op-ed, “Why Israel Can’t Make Peace with Hamas,” from Jeffrey Goldberg.

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National Jewish Book Awards Announced

Hot on the heels of the Sydney Taylor Book Awards announcement, the Jewish Book Council has named the latest recipients of the National Jewish Book Awards. Congratulations to all the winners and finalists!

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Source of Comfort: Avinu Malkeinu

Lately, I’ve been seeking comfort by finding and listening to Hebrew prayers/music on the Internet. From time to time, I’ll share some of my discoveries here. Today’s offering: Barbra Streisand’s rendition of the Avinu Malkeinu (“Our Father, Our King”), which is chanted during our High Holy Days. And for an alternate melody, but one that’s equally familiar to me, listen to this clip from a cantorial concert.

You’ll hear all Hebrew; I am looking for a complete translation online (something resembling what I’m used to seeing in the Gates of Repentance) prayerbook, but have not yet found one. Meantime, here’s the best I can do.

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Notes from Around the Web: Fourth Gaza Edition

Inside Higher Ed takes a look at “The Gaza War…on North American Campuses,” and points out that the rallies, petition drives, (and on the anti-Israel side, boycott efforts) “raise sensitive issues about whether academics are too quick or too slow to question Israel, what methods are appropriate for expressing opposition to another government’s actions, and why Israel’s actions are more likely to generate protests than outrages committed by other countries.” Like one of the commenters, I’m not happy about the suggestion in that last bit that Israel’s actions are, in fact, “outrages,” but otherwise, I think this is a pretty good piece.
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Another resource for simply keeping aware and informed: the Jewish Telegraphic Agency (JTA). Sign up for the daily newsletter. Among today’s articles is one that tells us the following: “Israel stopped fighting for three hours Monday, as it has daily for the past week, to allow Palestinian civilians to restock or change locations, and to allow aid agencies to distribute its goods during the 17th day of Operation Cast Lead. But Hamas continued to fire rockets at Israel during the lull, scoring direct hits on homes in Ashkelon and Sderot. No one was injured, although several people went into shock and the homes were badly damaged.” Where are the “humanitarian” protesters now? Probably still busy complaining about/rallying against Israel.
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On RJ.org, JanetheWriter has almost persuaded me to activate a Facebook account.

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Two Poetry Books TBR

Thanks to two recent reviews, I’m adding two more poetry books to my to-be-read list. The first is Jerusalem-based poet and translator Peter Cole’s Things on Which I’ve Stumbled, which Daisy Fried has reviewed here. The second is Poets on the Edge, an anthology of contemporary Hebrew poetry selected and translated by Tsipi Keller, which Alicia Ostriker discusses here. Hopefully I’ll get to both books soon, and have something to say about them.

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