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Pre-Shabbat Jewish Literary Links

Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

Every Friday My Machberet presents an array of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety. Since we’ll be taking a blog hiatus for the “rest of the year,” this is the final batch for 2016. See you again in January!

  • ICYMI: check out my dispatch from this year’s Hadassah magazine/Harold U. Ribalow Prize ceremony.
  • Speaking of prizes: Mazal tov to Ayelet Tsabari and Amy Gottlieb, who have been named winner and runner-up (for their respective works The Best Place on Earth and The Beautiful Possible) for the 2016 Edward Lewis Wallant Award.
  • On Hevria: writing advice from Matthue Roth.
  • Better late than never: I should have shared Judy Bolton-Fasman’s poignant essay “Memories of Cuba Past” several weeks ago.
  • And I’ll leave you with this Hanukkah poem for our times.
  • Shabbat shalom, chag sameach, and all good things until we meet again!

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    A Hanukkah Poem

    Giorgione’s “Judith”

     

    Rightful Places (A Poem for Hanukkah 5777/2016)

    By Erika Dreifus

    When, today, a woman’s right
    to wear a prayer shawl
    or read from the Torah
    or blow a shofar at the Kotel
    is actually the focus of a bill submitted to the Knesset,
    who can be surprised
    that Judith’s story
    is excluded from the Tanakh?

    For if Judith—
    brave,
    articulate,
    smart,
    powerful,
    pious,
    latter-day
    Hanukkah heroine

    Judith—
    had been granted admission
    to those holy pages,
    how on earth,
    all these centuries later,
    could anyone possibly justify
    denying her daughters
    our own rightful place?

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    Pre-Shabbat Jewish Literary Links

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday My Machberet presents an array of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • Via The Tower: an interview with Bernard-Henri Lévy ahead of the U.S. tour for The Genius of Judaism, translated by Steven M. Kennedy and slated for January publication.
  • Looking for Jewish kidlit recommendations ahead of Hanukkah? Rachel Kamin offers her suggestions for the Horn Book‘s Family Reading blog, while Marjorie Ingall compiles recommendations over on Tablet.
  • This month’s Jewish Book Carnival, with news, reviews, & interviews from the world of Jewish lit, posted yesterday over on the Fig Tree Books blog.
  • Speaking of Fig Tree Books, there’s a new giveaway running over on Goodreads–enter for a chance to win an advance copy of Abigail Pogrebin’s forthcoming My Jewish Year: 18 Holidays, One Wondering Jew.
  • And this weekend’s Torah portion, Vayishlach, inspired a new poem of mine that appears on the Lilith blog.
  • Shabbat shalom.

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    Words of the Week

    Meant to share this several days ago. The entire video is of course worth viewing; if you have limited time, do forward to the 55:30 mark and listen to Elisha Wiesel’s tribute to his father.

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    Pre-Shabbat Jewish Literary Links

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday My Machberet presents an array of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • If, like me, you didn’t make it to the launch of a new Forward anthology Monday evening in New York, you’ll be especially grateful for Talya Zax’s dispatch from the festivities. (Okay, you’ll also really be kicking yourself for not having been there.)
  • I did manage, however, to spend some wonderful minutes listening to the latest episode of the Israel in Translation podcast. In this installment, host Marcela Sulak reads from David Grossman’s A Horse Walks Into a Bar, which came out in Jessica Cohen’s English Translation last month in London (and will evidently be here in the USA in February).
  • #Readukkah week ended yesterday. See the event page on Facebook for the virtual celebration of Jewish lit.
  • The Kveller site, “for those who want to add a Jewish twist to their parenting,” is “super excited to announce the launch of the Kveller Writers Fellowship. The fellowship is designed to give moms (or dads!) who are also writers the support, mentorship, and experience necessary to take a transformative step forward in their careers.” NB: “The fellowship is open to writers of any experience. The four writers selected for the fellowship will work remotely, but will be flown out to New York City during the course of the fellowship for a day of in-person workshops with the team (and dinner. And drinks. Definitely drinks). The work produced during the fellowship will be published on Kveller, and fellows will receive payment for each contribution.” Application deadline: January 1, 2017.
  • And my Fig Tree Books colleagues and I so appreciated the invitation that Foreword Reviews extended to our publisher to help launch a post-election series of commentaries featuring small publishers and independent authors of diverse perspectives.
  • Shabbat shalom, everyone.

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    Words of the Week

    “Can you feel the center collapsing all around you?

    Looking to the left and to the right — politically and religiously, here and in Israel — I see the gap widening at an increasingly rapid rate. The search for The Golden Mean, the desirable balance between extremes in our lives and worldview advocated by the Rambam (Rabbi Moshe ben Maimon, the 12th-century philosopher), seems unattainable.”

    Source: Gary Rosenblatt, “Struggling For ‘The Middle Way’ In A World Of Extremes” (The Jewish Week)

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