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Pre-Shabbat Jewish Literary Links

Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen


Every Friday My Machberet presents an array of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • Over on Tablet, Adam Kirsch examines “where Jewish writers are finding [publishing] homes these days, and why.”
  • Speaking of Tablet: they’re looking for two paid, part-time fall editorial interns. (Don’t forget: Fig Tree Books is offering a paid internship as well.)
  • Spotlighting debut novels by Michelle Brafman and Diana Bletter, The Jewish Week‘s Sandee Brawarsky declares this to be “the summer of the chevra kadisha novel.”
  • I’ve followed poet Edward Hirsch’s work for many years; I read his book-length elegy for his son when it was published last year. So I appreciated this profile of Hirsch—and Gabriel—in the current issue of Moment magazine.
  • Finally, in the words of JTA/Suzanne Pollak, “In Jennifer Weiner’s hit novels, it’s a (Jewish) woman’s world.” (But many of you knew that already!)
  • Shabbat shalom.

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    Words of the Week

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    “When Jews murder in the name of Judaism we all bow our heads in shame and in mourning, for this is a loss both for Jews and for Judaism.”

    Source: Rabbi Josh Weinberg, ARZA President

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    Pre-Shabbat Jewish Literary Links

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday My Machberet presents an array of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • Just received in the mail: the latest issue of Moment magazine. There’s so much here that I’m eager to read, including a profile of Edward Hirsch, “the poet laureate of grief,” and work by the latest young-reviewer-winners of the magazine’s “Publish-a-Kid” contest.
  • Nice press attention this week for our Fig Tree Books authors: a Forward interview with Jessamyn Hope, a blogger’s take on The Book of Stone for The Times of Israel, and the first review of Ben Nadler’s forthcoming The Sea Beach Line.
  • New this week: Unorthodox, a podcast from Tablet (and Slate’s Panoply network) hosted by editor-at-large Mark Oppenheimer and featuring senior writer Liel Leibovitz and deputy editor Stephanie Butnick. “Unorthodox is a smart, fresh, fun take on Jewish news and culture.” I listened to the inaugural episode; I was impressed!
  • Lisa Silverman’s “Good Summer Reads for Kids” article for Jewish Journal includes some great-sounding books.
  • Finally, over on the reBar project, I reveal the one way becoming a Bat Mitzvah might have been even more meaningful to me.
  • Shabbat shalom.

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    From My Bookshelf: World Literature Today’s “New Hebrew Writing” Issue

    may15cover_thumbIt isn’t every day that I’m inspired to purchase a single issue of a magazine, journal, or newspaper. I subscribe to a sufficient abundance of periodicals such that the tower of books on my nightstand at any moment is equaled by a nearly equally tall stack of periodicals.

    But when I saw that World Literature Today‘s special May-August 2015 double issue included a feature on “New Hebrew Writing”–only a small sampling of which was available online–I went ahead and ordered a copy. And I’m glad that I did so.

    For the most part. Continue reading ›

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    Pre-Shabbat Jewish Literary Links

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday My Machberet presents an array of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • Fab photos from Monday evening’s Scribblers on the Roof reading at Ansche Chesed in New York. (I was lucky to be in attendance.)
  • This collection of poets’ reflections on memorable summer-reading experiences includes some especially “Jewish” recollections.
  • Over on NewYorker.com, Arthur Krystal chronicles a story of “[F. Scott] Fitzgerald and the Jews.”
  • The Fig Tree Books blogs celebrates a “Malamud-apalooza” of sorts, with three writers revisiting novels by Bernard Malamud.
  • May the memory of E.L. Doctorow be a blessing.
  • Shabbat shalom, everyone.

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    Words of the Week

    “Information changes when it moves from one context to another. To cite a recurring example in the kibbutzniks’ conversations at the time: it is one thing to remark that seeing displaced Palestinians in wartime reminds you of the situation of Jews in the Holocaust—meaning that you remind yourself of the Nazis—if you are speaking in Hebrew to other shaken Jewish veterans in a bomb shelter a week or two after returning from the battlefield. Saying the same thing, as this movie does, to a sated film-festival audience at Sundance or Cannes is something else. It is one thing to say this at a time when many Israelis were gripped by elation at their victory and when the plight of the Palestinians was largely ignored both in Israel and abroad; it is quite another to do so in 2015, when Israel has become singled out as the world’s most egregious violator of human rights, if not the new incarnation of Nazism. And it is one thing to draw a comparison with the Holocaust in a booklet intended for other kibbutzniks, which is what the soldiers believed they were doing in 1967—and quite another to say this in a movie co-produced by Germans.”

    Source: Matti Friedman, “Israel and the Moral Striptease,” Mosaic magazine.

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