Writer. Reader. Reviewer. Resource Maven.

See You in the New Year

As noted on my other blog, I’m taking a brief break from blogging for the rest of 2015. See you again in the new year!

Share

Share

From My Bookshelf: Leah Kaminsky’s THE WAITING ROOM

WaitingRoomCoverI was all set to wait patiently for the U.S. release of Leah Kaminsky‘s debut novel The Waiting Room (which will happen next fall). But then, the author—an Australian whom I’ve yet to meet in person but with whom I’ve developed another of those wonderful “online friendships” I’m so grateful for—sent me a gift copy of the original Australian edition, which was published this past September. And how pleased I am that she did.

There’s so much that’s noteworthy about this book, beginning with the subject matter. What I realized only a few pages in is that The Waiting Room brings together two topics that are often categorized separately among Diaspora readers. First, there’s its Holocaust thread. Protagonist Dina Ronen, Australian-born, is the daughter of two Holocaust survivors. Her father died during Dina’s childhood; her mother has passed away by the time the novel opens, with Dina a married mother of one young son and another baby about a month away from delivery. But her mother’s ghost speaks throughout the book, and we return often to her parents’ histories in flashbacks. Continue reading ›

Share

Labels: , ,

Share

Pre-Shabbat Jewish Literary Links

Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

Every Friday My Machberet presents an array of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • From Jewish Action magazine: “The State of Orthodox Kidlit” (thanks to @StuartSchnee for this one).
  • The Jewish Community Center of Metropolitan Detroit is advertising for a Director, Lenore Marwil Jewish Film Festival and Jewish Book Fair.
  • The Jewish Community Library (San Francisco) seeks a Program Coordinator.
  • This week brought the latest Jewish Book Carnival, with contributions from around the blogosphere.
  • And on the Fig Tree Books blog, you’ll find my summary of Shulem Deen’s keynote address at Sunday’s Jewish Book Council Jewish Writers’ Seminar.
  • Shabbat shalom.

    Share

    Labels: , , ,

    Share

    Words of the Week

    “I read web and social media and it’s shocking how liberal Jews (I consider myself one, recall) so quick to righteously protest the sufferings of just about everyone else in the world, rarely have expressed any sorrow for the knifing of Jewish children. Sadly they seem to have been bullied by the BDS types, by the social media sewer of anti-Semitism, the Shylockization of Netanyahu. By the ‘moral equivalence’ ‘cycle of violence’ narrative. Can’t feel bad about murdered Jews if a right wing government’s in power. To the extent that if a liberal Jew speaks up for the murdered at a dinner party he is suddenly Sheldon Adelson. Or the Jew in the Annie Hall dinner scene abruptly finding himself clothed in Hasidic garb (not that there’s anything wrong with that).”

    Source: Ron Rosenbaum, “Thinking the Unthinkable: A Lamentation for the State of Israel” (Tablet)

    Share

    Labels: ,

    Share

    Pre-Shabbat Jewish Literary Links

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday My Machberet presents an array of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • “The Mizrahi poets of Ars Poetica have a lot to say—and the whole country [Israel] is listening.” From The Tower magazine.
  • “Of Song Sheets and Latkes”: a Hanukkah story by Susan Messer, on the Moment website.
  • Hanukkah time is also #Readukkah time, and the Fig Tree Books blog took note on Tuesday.
  • Starting Sunday: the annual meeting of the Association of Jewish Studies. Follow along with the #AJS15 hashtag.
  • And last, but perhaps not least: my dispatch, for Tablet, from a recent celebration of Anzia Yezierska’s classic Bread Givers.
  • Shabbat shalom.

    Share

    Labels: , , ,

    Share

    From My Bookshelf: SLIDING DOORS AND OTHER STORIES

    Readukkah-1Rebecca Klempner is one of the wonderful people I’ve had the privilege and pleasure of getting to know via the Internet, where I frequently read her essays and reviews and “converse” with her via email and social media. Several months ago, she announced that she’d be publishing a book of short stories for younger readers. As soon as Sliding Doors and Other Stories was available, I purchased a copy for my Kindle. It took me a little while to focus on reading them, but I’m happy to say that I have finally done so. And as part of the wonderful #Readukkah initiative from the Association of Jewish Libraries, I’m proud to share this Q&A with the author just as we prepare the kindle this year’s first Hanukkah candles. (I suspect that I am bending the #Readukkah rules somewhat by presenting a Q&A instead of a review, but I hope that I’ll be forgiven for so doing.)

    Sliding Doors and Other Stories comprises 17 short stories (and one essay). In a note to readers, the author explains that she wrote the stories in this collection “for several of the magazines that serve the Orthodox community.” Elsewhere, she has indicated that the target readership for this book is likely between 11 and 16 years of age.

    Rebecca Klempner is an wife, mother, and writer living in Los Angeles. Born in Baltimore, she grew up in Columbia, Maryland; Israel; and Las Vegas, Nevada. She attended St. Mary’s College of Maryland and American University, where she obtained a master’s degree in applied anthropology. In 1998, she headed to Los Angeles for a stint in Teach for America. She remained there and taught for five years before becoming a stay-at-home mother. In 2005, she sold her first picture book: A Dozen Daisies for Raizy was published in 2008 by Hachai. Subsequently, she’s written for many magazines – print and online – including Mishpacha, Ami, Hamodia, Binah, Tablet, and The Jewish Home.

    Please welcome Rebecca Klempner! Continue reading ›

    Share

    Labels: , ,

    Share