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Tag Archive for ‘Anglo-Jewish literature’ rss

Words of the Week

“In an apparent softening of party tone, Corbyn’s warm-up man, the journalist Owen Jones, recently reprimanded the Left for its ingrained anti-Semitism. Welcome words, but they will remain only words so long as the Corbynite Left – and indeed the not-so Corbynite Left – refuses to acknowledge the degree to which anti-Semitism is snarled up in the before and after of Israelophobia. The Stop The War Coalition is a sort of home to Jew-haters because its hate music about Israel is so catchy. It simplifies a complex and heartbreaking conflict, it elides causes and effects, it perpetuates a fable that flatters one side and demonises another, it ignores all instances of intransigence and cruelty but one, inflaming hatred and enabling the very racism it declares itself opposed to. 

Let’s forget whether or not anti-Semitism is the root of this. It is sufficient that it is the consequence. Face that, Corbyn, or the offence you take at any imputation of prejudice is the hollow hypocrite’s offence, and your protestations of loving peace and justice, no matter who believes them, are as ash.”

Read the full text of author Howard Jacobson’s “Corbyn may say he’s not anti-Semitic, but associating with the people he does is its own crime” on The Independent‘s website.

A note: I’m sorry that the final “Words of the Week” entry for 5775 is not exactly upbeat. But as a writer, I found that Jacobson’s piece took on greater urgency for me because just as I discovered it I also ran across news of a “Poets for Corbyn” project. And then, this morning, came the news from Britain that Corbyn has been elected Labour Party leader.

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Pre-Shabbat Jewish Literary Links

Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

Every Friday My Machberet presents an array of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • The latest issue of Jewish Woman magazine features an interview with my wonderful colleague, Fig Tree Books Editor-in-Chief Michelle Caplan.
  • Two great resources for learning more about Israeli literature: Beth Kissileff’s article on Israeli expat writers to watch (JTA) and a mini-collection of Israeli short stories. (via CultureBuzz Israel)
  • Speaking of literature based in Israel: The Ilanot Review at Bar-Ilan University has issued a new call for submissions on the theme of “constraint.” (NB: nonpaying publication).
  • The PJ Library in Los Angeles is looking for five part-time “Community Connectors.”
  • And, ICYMI, read Oliver Sacks’s final piece for The New Yorkeron gefilte fish.
  • This is the last pre-Shabbat post of 5775–so let me wish you all a Shabbat Shalom AND a Shanah Tovah!

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    Pre-Shabbat Jewish Literary Links

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday My Machberet presents an array of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • Podcast I intend to listen to this weekend: Gil Roth interviewing Thane Rosenbaum for The Virtual Memories Show.
  • On the occasion of Anthony Trollope’s 200th birthday, Ann Marlowe argues that Trollope is “the most Jewish of the great English novelists.” (I *need* to read some Trollope. But where to begin?)
  • Grateful for this summary of a New York Public Library “Children’s Literary Salon” that focused on Jewish kidlit.
  • ICYMI: My latest “From My Bookshelf” post here on My Machberet spotlights Michal Lemberger’s After Abel and Other Stories.
  • Finally, Fig Tree Books, publisher of fiction on the American Jewish experience, made a big announcement this week. (Hint: It has something to do with forthcoming titles.)
  • Shabbat Shalom!

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    Pre-Shabbat Jewish Literary Links

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday My Machberet presents an array of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • Liam Hoare shares “Knishes and Kilts, and Other Highlights of London’s Jewish Book Week” on the eJewishPhilanthropy site.
  • New on the Fig Tree Books site: Kathe Pinchuk’s review of Anne Roiphe’s Lovingkindness.
  • Did you miss the chance to hear authors Anita Diamant and Dara Horn in conversation? Thanks to Moment magazine, you can now read a transcript.
  • Michael Weingrad’s analysis of Reuven Namdar’s Sapir Prize-winning novel (for Mosaic) makes me even more eager for the translation than I already was.
  • And speaking of translation: podcaster Gil Roth recently met with eminent translator Anthea Bell; their ensuing discussion contains plenty of “Jewy” material and is well worth a listen.
  • Shabbat shalom, friends.

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    Pre-Shabbat Jewish Literary Links

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday My Machberet presents an array of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • In “the first of a five-part series on growing anti-Semitism in the U.K.,” Tablet magazine presents Howard Jacobson, “the literary voice of British Jewry.”
  • Mazal tov to the winners and finalists for the Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature!
  • Barbara Krasner offers “7 Reasons Why a Writer Should Attend the Annual Association of Jewish Libraries Conference.”
  • Having recently read Anita Diamant’s The Boston Girl, I thought Gloria Kestenbaum’s review for The Jewish Week‘s Well Versed blog was spot-on.
  • I’m only halfway through, but I already agree with my friend Rebecca Klempner, who pronounces this recorded interview with Dara Horn “required reading [watching?] for anyone interested in writing the Jewish experience.”
  • Shabbat shalom.

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    My Year in Jewish Books

    StarFor the past three years, I’ve found it useful (and kind of fun) to look back on “my year in Jewish books.” So, borrowing some of the same introductory wording, I’m going to attempt to do something similar for 2014.

    Reviewing my reading for 2014 (thank you, Goodreads!), I can see that I do not and would not ever limit my reading to “Jewish books” exclusively; it seems that this list comprises about half of the titles I read this year in toto. (By the way, in case you haven’t heard me say this before, I define “Jewish books” in the simplest terms as books with substantive Jewish content. In my view, non-Jewish authors can write “Jewish books.” And Jewish authors can write books that don’t strike me as overtly Jewish.)

    But this year, as usual, I did read quite a few books that fall within the “Jewish book” category. And, as an advocate for Jewish literature, I’m proud of that.

    Below, you will find these books presented in the order in which I read them (most recent first, this year). Please note that, where appropriate, I have included links to reviews, essays, and newsy items I have written; interviews I have conducted; “Sunday Sentence” citations; and the odd blog post. I have also disclosed how I obtained each book: P (purchase), R (complimentary review copy), L (library). This year, I’m adding a category: FTB, for books I’ve read in manuscript prior to their release from Fig Tree Books in my job as FTB media editor. Continue reading ›

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