Writer. Reader. Reviewer. Resource Maven.

Tag Archive for ‘Canadian-Jewish literature’ rss

Pre-Shabbat Jewish Literary Links

Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen


Every Friday My Machberet presents an array of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • The latest newsletter from Fig Tree Books features the final pre-publication giveaway for Jessamyn Hope’s debut novel Safekeeping, and lots more JLit info.
  • Wonderful profile in The Jewish Week of Ayelet Tsabari and her mission to tell Mizrahi stories.
  • In the new Brevity magazine: “Heathen, Slave, Woman”—a powerful short excerpt from Judy Bolton-Fasman’s recently completed memoir.
  • “Kveller.com is seeking a full-time editorial assistant to join our New York-based team.”
  • And to conclude: Torah limericks.
  • Shabbat shalom.

    Labels: , , ,

    Share

    My Year in Jewish Books

    StarFor the past three years, I’ve found it useful (and kind of fun) to look back on “my year in Jewish books.” So, borrowing some of the same introductory wording, I’m going to attempt to do something similar for 2014.

    Reviewing my reading for 2014 (thank you, Goodreads!), I can see that I do not and would not ever limit my reading to “Jewish books” exclusively; it seems that this list comprises about half of the titles I read this year in toto. (By the way, in case you haven’t heard me say this before, I define “Jewish books” in the simplest terms as books with substantive Jewish content. In my view, non-Jewish authors can write “Jewish books.” And Jewish authors can write books that don’t strike me as overtly Jewish.)

    But this year, as usual, I did read quite a few books that fall within the “Jewish book” category. And, as an advocate for Jewish literature, I’m proud of that.

    Below, you will find these books presented in the order in which I read them (most recent first, this year). Please note that, where appropriate, I have included links to reviews, essays, and newsy items I have written; interviews I have conducted; “Sunday Sentence” citations; and the odd blog post. I have also disclosed how I obtained each book: P (purchase), R (complimentary review copy), L (library). This year, I’m adding a category: FTB, for books I’ve read in manuscript prior to their release from Fig Tree Books in my job as FTB media editor. Continue reading ›

    Labels: , , , , , ,

    Share

    Pre-Shabbat Jewish Literary Links

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • Not for the first time, I’m pointing you to an extraordinary piece by Kevin Haworth. This time: “On Never Having Read Anne Frank”.
  • From Mosaic magazine: the inimitable Ruth Wisse writes about Nora Gold’s Fields of Exile: “I am grateful for a work of fiction that honestly animates what is all too actual and true.”
  • New award for fiction on Jewish themes: the Amy Levy Prize.
  • On the Well Versed blog: the latest about Granta Israel.
  • And another milestone for Fig Tree Books!
  • Shabbat shalom.

    Labels: , , , , ,

    Share

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • A thoughtful review of Nora Gold’s Fields of Exile, which you’ve heard about here before.
  • Interesting call: “For this special issue of Prooftexts on Jewish Literature/World Literature, we seek papers that address Jewish literary multilingualism, translation, and circulation. Essays should combine theoretical and methodological concerns with readings of Jewish-language texts to illustrate the productive intersections of Jewish literature with the discourse on world literature.”
  • On the Lilith blog, Talia Lavin writes “On Mothers, Sisters, Narrative and War.”
  • “The interdisciplinary symposium ‘Global Yiddish Culture, 1938 – 1948′ invites historians, literary scholars, sociologists, cinema and theatre scholars to think about the nature of Yiddish culture that developed during this difficult period in Jewish history.”
  • Finally, I’m sad to say that this poem of mine, “Questions for the Critics,” is once again relevant.
  • Shabbat shalom.

    Labels: , , , ,

    Share

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen


    Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • “A decade after its publication, Canadian author David Bezmozgis is turning his debut short story collection, ‘Natasha and Other Stories,’ into a film.”
  • The Well Versed blog chimes in with a dispatch from the Fourth International Writers Festival in Jerusalem.
  • Fathom interviews Philip Mendes regarding his new book, Jews and the Left: The Rise and Fall of a Political Alliance.
  • Read Hebrew? You may want to look into Granta Israel. Beth Kissileff has the background.
  • On my own weekend reading agenda: Saul Bellow’s “A Silver Dish,” now available on NewYorker.com.
  • Shabbat shalom.

    Labels: , , , , , ,

    Share

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • On my reading list: the latest issue of 614, the eZine from the Hadassah-Brandeis Institute. Issue theme: “Jewish Women and Comics.”
  • Something else I didn’t quite get to focus on (yet) this busy week: “a newly reissued short story from the under-appreciated late writer” Shirley Faessler that “revives Jewish Toronto of the 1930s.” On Tablet.
  • Also on Tablet: a long piece about the events that are at the heart of a play I’ve written about, Motti Lerner’s “The Admission.”
  • The latest New Yorker fiction podcast features Joyce Carol Oates on Cynthia Ozick’s “The Shawl.”
  • Brief post about the inaugural Seminar on Jewish Story.
  • Shabbat shalom!

    Labels: , , ,

    Share