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Pre-Shabbat Jewish Literary Links

Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

Every Friday My Machberet presents an array of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • It was quite a moment when Judy Bolton-Fasman told Gold Star father and American patriot Khzir Khan about the lamed vavniks—and her belief that he stands among them. (I dare you not to tear up at the last paragraph of this piece.)
  • And another poignant, powerful piece: a review-essay by Nina Badzin on the resonance, this Passover holiday, of Abigail Pogrebin’s My Jewish Year.
  • Pogrebin’s aforementioned new book is one of “Eight New Books for Passover 5777” recommended by the Jewish Book Council’s Nat Bernstein.
  • An especially good episode of “Israel in Translation” includes a link to Almog Behar’s website, where you can freely download, a new draft version of collected translations of Behar’s poems and stories and some other texts, in a bilingual (Hebrew/English) edition.
  • And over on my other blog, I’ve shared some exciting news about a poetry contest sponsored by the Manhattan Jewish Experience.
  • Shabbat shalom, and happiest Passover wishes!

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    ICYMI: Video Recordings of Recent #JewLit Events

    One of the wonders of our modern world: recordings of literary events that make it possible for us to “attend” readings, conversations, and seminars—no matter where we live or what time of day we might be able to watch them.

    Here are just three events from the past week or so that I have viewed and recommend highly:

    CONFESSIONS OF A HASIDIC POET
    Yehoshua November interviewed by journalist Danielle Ziri of the Jerusalem Post (Manhattan Jewish Experience).

    Continue reading ›

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    Pre-Shabbat Jewish Literary Links

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday My Machberet presents an array of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • Mazal tov to Richard Chess on the publication of his latest poetry collection. I can’t wait to read Love Nailed to the Doorpost, which Rick recently discussed in this interview.
  • Not sure how I’ve missed this incredible online treasure, but TeachGreatJewishBooks.org is an amazing resource.
  • “This year, feminist Jewish magazine Lilith is celebrating 40 years in print. On March 26, there will be a celebration at Brandeis University, where Lilith’s archives of manuscripts, photographs, letters, cover art, notes, drafts, and much more can be viewed by the public. The celebration will feature a panel which will include Keshet Executive Director Idit Klein. The Sunday afternoon panel is free and open to the public with pre-registration.” More details/RSVP info available here.
  • News from Jerusalem: “Best-selling authors are coming to the Tower of David at the Jaffa Gate for a new series of literary events in English presented in cooperation with The Times of Israel.” (Thanks to @DevorahBlachor for the tip on this one.)
  • And here’s one more Jewish-lit event to share (and this one will be livestreamed): Abigail Pogrebin and Rabbi Joseph Telushkin in conversation at the Jewish Theological Seminary, Monday evening, 7:30 pm (New York time).
  • Shabbat shalom, everyone.

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    Pre-Shabbat Jewish Literary Links

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday My Machberet presents an array of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • It has been a big week for our team at Fig Tree Books: Abigail Pogrebin’s My Jewish Year: 18 Holidays, One Wondering Jew is officially out in the world. There’s been lots of great press so far. Appearing yesterday: a super Q&A on Gretchen Rubin’s blog (with a special shoutout for Shabbat).
  • This week also brought the latest Jewish Book Carnival, which routinely features news, reviews, and interviews from the Jewish literary blogosphere. (Hosted for March by Barbara Krasner/The Whole Megillah.)
  • A timely look, 50 years later, at “Natan Alterman or Amos Oz? The Six-Day War and Israeli Literature” (by Liam Hoare for Fathom).
  • Two superb “long reads” for the weekend: Maxim D. Shrayer’s Mosaic essay on Russia’s Jews, and Sabine Heinlein’s “The Restless Ghosts of Baiersdorf”.
  • And speaking of long reads—if you’ve never read George Eliot’s Daniel Deronda (or if you want to immerse yourself in it anew), the Tikvah Fund has an online learning opportunity for you.
  • Shabbat shalom, everyone!

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    Pre-Shabbat Jewish Literary Links

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday My Machberet presents an array of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • A gorgeous poem by Rick Chess, “The Next Abraham,” in a blog post of the same title.
  • Marvelous short story by Susan Daitch, “Festival of the Departed,” on Tablet.
  • “PJ Library®, an international, award-winning, Jewish family engagement program created by the Harold Grinspoon Foundation (HGF), is seeking an International Lead to take a lead role in managing and growing PJ Library programs and the various partnerships that sustain them around the world.”
  • “Israeli banknotes will soon be graced with female faces of the Hebrew poetesses Rachel Bluwstein and Leah Goldberg.” (See the Forward‘s dispatch.)
  • And over at the day job, the Fig Tree Books team was thrilled to see another enthusiastic pre-publication review for Abigail Pogrebin’s My Jewish Year: 18 Holidays, One Wondering Jew.
  • Shabbat shalom.

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    My Year in Jewish Books

    StarFor the past five years, I’ve found it useful (and kind of fun) to look back on “my year in Jewish books.” So, borrowing some of the same introductory wording, I’m going to attempt to do something similar for 2016.

    Reviewing my reading for 2016 (thank you, Goodreads!), I can see that, again, I do not and would not ever limit my reading to “Jewish books” exclusively. (By the way, in case you haven’t heard me say this before, I define “Jewish books” in the simplest terms as books with substantive Jewish content. In my view, non-Jewish authors can write “Jewish books.” And Jewish authors can write books that don’t strike me as overtly Jewish.)

    But this year, as usual, I did read quite a few books that fall within the “Jewish book” category. And, as an advocate for Jewish literature, I’m proud of that.

    Below, you will find these books presented in the order in which I read them (most recent first).  I have also disclosed how I obtained each book: P (purchase), R (complimentary review copy), L (library), G (gift), or FTB (for books I’ve read in manuscript prior to their release from Fig Tree Books in my job as FTB media editor OR as part of the ongoing series of spotlights posts on past winners of the Edward Lewis Wallant Award). Continue reading ›

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