Writer. Reader. Reviewer. Resource Maven.

Tag Archive for ‘Quiet Americans’ rss

Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • Mazel tov to the latest winner & honor titles recognized by the ALA Sophie Brody Award committee.
  • The latest issue of The Ilanot Review, themed “Sacred Words,” has gone live.
  • Forward staffer Josh Nathan-Kazis explores his Sephardic roots and history in this longform piece.
  • Ways to help Holocaust survivors who are living in poverty (note the inclusion of The Blue Card, to which I send quarterly donations based on sales of Quiet Americans).
  • And last, but maybe not least: I’ve got a brief essay on the Lilith blog this week titled “A Not-so-Modest Proposal: Add Another Matriarch to the Mix.”
  • Shabbat shalom.

    Labels: , , ,

    Share

    Wednesday’s WIP: Memories, My German Passport & Me

    Grandma & Me at My Sister's College Graduation, 1994

    Grandma & Me at My Sister’s College Graduation, 1994

    So long as the anticipated snowstorm doesn’t shut down the city, before I head to the day job today, I’m stopping off at the German consulate, where I’m renewing my German passport. When I went online to book my appointment back in November–you need to make one, you can’t handle this by mail–I thought it was really something that the first available appointment was January 22: my German grandmother’s birthday.

    As many of you already know, my grandmother–who would be 99 today–was a huge influence on the stories in my collection, Quiet Americans. Which celebrated the third anniversary of its publication a few days ago, too.

    And as for my passport, it was the focus of one of my first published essays. The scan quality isn’t great, but I’ve uploaded a copy of “Passport from the Past,” which was published in the Boston Sunday Globe in 1997.

    [UPDATE: The city schools (and my office) are open--but transit is dicey and non-essential travels around the city aren't in the cards this morning. I'm going straight to work and rescheduling the consular appointment. I think that Grandma would approve!]

    Labels: , , , ,

    Share

    Wednesday’s WIP: Kristallnacht in Poetry & Prose (Part II)

    The shattered stained glass windows of the Zerrennerstrasse synagogue after its destruction on Kristallnacht. Pforzheim, Germany, ca. November 10, 1938. (USHMM/Stadtarchiv Pforzheim)

    The shattered stained glass windows of the Zerrennerstrasse synagogue after its destruction on Kristallnacht. Pforzheim, Germany, ca. November 10, 1938. (USHMM/Stadtarchiv Pforzheim)

    If you follow my other blog (My Machberet), you may have noticed a weekend post about the 75th anniversary of the pogrom known as “Kristallnacht” and ways in which the event has shown up in my own writing, particularly in some of the stories in my collection Quiet Americans.

    But I’m far from the only one to have written about Kristallnacht in some way. This week also brought plenty of reminders of that fact.

  • After seeing my post, Lawrence Schimel pointed me to this piece of his. Via Twitter, he added that it is part of a larger project–“IN THE SCHWARZWALD: poems using Grimm fairy tales as the lens through which to examine the Holocaust.”
  • Also notable: Janet Kirchheimer’s op-ed, published last week, about Holocaust remembrance through poetry. (I met Janet and became familiar with her work when we appeared on a panel together in 2011.)
  • Finally, this week brought me the good fortune of meeting up here in New York with Jonathan Kirsch, whose latest book (The Short, Strange Life of Herschel Grynszpan: A Boy Avenger, a Nazi Diplomat, and a Murder in Paris), is intimately connected with the history of Kristallnacht.
  • How about you? Are there any literary works you’d recommend that address Kristallnacht?

    Labels: ,

    Share

    Kristallnacht in Poetry & Prose

    The shattered stained glass windows of the Zerrennerstrasse synagogue after its destruction on Kristallnacht. Pforzheim, Germany, ca. November 10, 1938. (USHMM/Stadtarchiv Pforzheim)

    The shattered stained glass windows of the Zerrennerstrasse synagogue after its destruction on Kristallnacht. Pforzheim, Germany, ca. November 10, 1938. (USHMM/Stadtarchiv Pforzheim)

     

    Kristallnacht, literally, “Night of Crystal,” is often referred to as the “Night of Broken Glass.” The name refers to the wave of violent anti-Jewish pogroms which took place on November 9 and 10, 1938, throughout Germany, annexed Austria, and in areas of the Sudetenland in Czechoslovakia recently occupied by German troops.”

    Kristallnacht figures as an essential turning point in Nazi Germany’s persecution of Jews, which culminated in the attempt to annihilate the European Jews.”

    Both of my paternal grandparents had arrived safely in the United States before the Kristallnacht of November 1938. And yet, among the stories my grandmother told over the years, the tale of how her parents and other loved ones back in Germany experienced the horrific events lodged in my mind and in my heart. Continue reading ›

    Labels: ,

    Share

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • Marjorie Ingall considers the plethora of poultry in new Jewish children’s books.
  • Over on The Whole Megillah, there’s an exciting announcement about the first “Whole Megillah Conference on Jewish Story,” scheduled for May 2014 and covering children’s writing, memoir, poetry, and fiction.
  • If you’ve got a blog post to contribute to the next Jewish Book Carnival, you have until Monday (November 11) to send it in to this month’s host. Details here.
  • I plan to take some time this weekend to peruse the latest issue of Blue Lyra Review, a journal whose self-described aim “is to bring together the voices of writers and artists from a diverse array of backgrounds, paying special homage to Jewish writers and other communities that are historically underrepresented in literary magazines.”
  • A reminder: This weekend marks the 75th anniversary of Kristallnacht. (Some of my own family history from that episode turns up in one of the stories in my collection Quiet Americans.)
  • Shabbat shalom.

    Labels: , , , ,

    Share