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Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • Just in time for Rosh Hashanah: a new issue from JewishFiction.net.
  • Etgar Keret recalls writing his first short story.
  • Tent: “immersive, intense, free, week-long workshops for anyone, ages 21 to 30, who’s curious about the connections between Jewishness and modern culture.” Offerings include workshops in creative writing and journalism.
  • “Starting in September, Lizzie Skurnick Books, an imprint of Ig Publishing, will begin rereleasing the classic Y.A. literature that Skurnick has already made a career of celebrating.” Including the All-of-a-Kind Family series.
  • And finally, an essay by yours truly, “Childless Does Not Mean Clueless,” on The Forward’s “The Sisterhood” blog.
  • Shabbat shalom.

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    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • Publishers Weekly has given a starred review to Jason K. Friedman’s short-story collection, Fire Year, which won the Sarabande Press Mary McCarthy Prize for Short Fiction. Here’s the review’s first line: “These seven funny, fearless outsiders’ tales set in Savannah and Atlanta—some depicting bygone orthodox Jewish communities, others the rife-with-irony “New South”—gravitate toward taboo.” The book will be published in November. (h/t Racelle Rosett)
  • Over on Tablet, Marjorie Ingall recommends three Jewish biographies (ostensibly for children) that “are so unabashedly fabulous, such a perfect blend of writing and art, so good at explaining complicated subjects, so inspiring without being sappy, you need to stop what you’re doing and buy them all right now.”
  • An exemplary “negative review”Michael Berenbaum’s sage and sensitive analysis of BDS advocate Alice Walker’s latest book. (On a related note: my reaction to the news that the University of Michigan’s Center for the Education of Women had rescinded an invitation for Walker to address its 50th-anniversary celebration gathering.)
  • On Bloomberg.com, Manuela Hoelterhoff takes readers through what Laurie Muchnick calls “surprising tour of novels and memoirs about the Nazi period.”
  • The Forward‘s “The Sisterhood” blog is asking readers for brief submissions (up to 200 words) to include in a larger package on the role of Jewish women in mourning. Submission deadline is August 28. Details and submission form provided here. (NB: This is a nonpaying opportunity.)
  • Shabbat shalom.

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    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • Oh, what a find! Israeli authors reading from their books (with English captions/subtitles provided).
  • “But I’ll just say it unequivocally and then back off if need be: the most timeless, lasting novellas of the second half of the 20th century were written by Jewish novella-writers.” That’s Daniel Torday’s argument for The ProsenPeople. Read the post to see if Torday convinces you.
  • Fascinating piece by Kevin Haworth on the Michigan Quarterly Review website: “What Do People Do All Day? Palestinian Version.”
  • Bar-Ilan University in Israel is launching an M.A. program in English literature with a focus on literary translation. Curriculum includes literature, creative writing, Jewish studies, and translation.
  • “David Ehrlich is best known as the founder of Tmol Shilshom, a bookstore café in the heart of Jerusalem that has long been a popular gathering place for writers and artists. It’s named after the novel by S. Y. Agnon and has hosted readings by the leading lights of Israeli literature, from Yehuda Amichai to David Grossman, as well as renowned writers from abroad. Ehrlich is himself a writer, primarily of essays and short stories. Now Syracuse University Press has published Who Will Die Last: Stories of Life in Israel, the first collection of his stories to be translated into English.” Listen to one of those stories in this Vox Tablet podcast.
  • Shabbat shalom.

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    Beyond Birthright: How Fortysomethings Can Cultivate Jewish Connections

    ejewishphilanthropyToday’s eJewish Philanthropy newsletter includes an article by yours truly. Especially if you happen to a Jewish fortysomething, I hope you’ll spend a few moments reading “Beyond Birthright: How Fortysomethings Can Cultivate Jewish Connections.” (Lots of ideas here for those seeking Jewishly-inflected reading and writing resources, by the way.) Thanks in advance for taking a look!

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    Job Opportunity with New Voices magazine/Jewish Student Press Service

    This just noticed:

    Seeking recent college grad for full-time position: Editor in Chief of New Voices Magazine (newvoices.org) and Executive Director of Jewish Student Press Service.

    New Voices Magazine and the Jewish Student Press Service (JSPS) have a full-time job opening for the Editor in Chief of an online magazine and Executive Director of the small nonprofit that publishes it. The start date is September 2013.

    New Voices (est. 1991) is a national, independent magazine written by and for Jewish college students. Now a web-based publication, New Voices is published by the nonprofit Jewish Student Press Service, which was originally established in 1970 by a group of student activists to connect Jewish campus newspapers across the country.

    New Voices covers Jewish issues from a student perspective, and has traditionally been progressive and pluralistic. New Voices and JSPS have launched the careers of countless journalists now working in both Jewish and mainstream media.

    The salary is $32,000 per year and the position includes health benefits.

    Full description available on JournalismJobs.com.

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