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Pre-Shabbat Jewish Literary Links

Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

Every Friday My Machberet presents an array of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • As usual, the November issue of the Generations of the Shoah International (GSI) newsletter has lots of book events listed.
  • Over on the Fig Tree Books blog, we’re celebrating the talents of Dara Horn.
  • We’ve all been thinking of Yitzhak Rabin this week; Matti Friedman has written about Dan Ephron’s book on the assassination.
  • Jewish Book Month starts today–check out my recent blog post on poetry titles I’m hoping to read asap.
  • And if fiction’s more your thing, Rachel Kamin and Library Journal have you covered.
  • Shabbat shalom.

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    From My Bookshelf: Poetry for Jewish Book Month

    As you may already know, tomorrow brings the beginning of the 90th year of Jewish Book Month. And in anticipation, I’m sharing a few poetry titles that are on my tbr list.

    But first, a quick look back on my latest read: Inspired by sample poems written by Dan Pagis (1930-1986) about the biblical characters Adam/Eve/Cain/Abel—poems distributed by instructor Amy Gottlieb in a class I’m taking at the Drisha Institute—I spent a chunk of last weekend reading Variable Directions, a full collection of Pagis’s work translated by Stephen Mitchell. And I’m very glad that I did.

    Now that I’ve returned Variable Directions to the library, here are three additional poetry titles awaiting my attention.

    FullSizeRender-22 Continue reading ›

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    Pre-Shabbat Jewish Lit Links

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday My Machberet presents an array of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • Mitch Ginsburg profiles Dalia Betolin-Sherman on the occasion of the publication of the Ethiopian-born Israeli writer’s first story in English.
  • Mazal tov to the winner and honorable mentions for this year’s ALA/Sophie Brody Medal for outstanding achievement in Jewish literature.
  • On the Fig Tree Books website: a fresh appraisal of Isaac Bashevis Singer’s Shosha.
  • Some of the most moving moments of this past week for me: watching “Defiant Requiem,” a documentary “which illuminates the extraordinary, untold story of the brave acts of resistance by the Jewish prisoners at Terezín.” Let’s just say that although I’ve always loved Verdi’s Requiem, I’ll never listen to it in quite the same way again.
  • “The Jewish Student Press Service is looking to hire a recent or soon-to-be college graduate for the full-time position of editor-in-chief of the national Jewish student magazine New Voices. The new editor would simultaneously serve as executive director of the Jewish Student Press Service.”
  • Shabbat shalom.

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    Pre-Shabbat Jewish Literary Links

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday My Machberet presents an array of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • Enjoy this remarkable account of “Two Days with I.B. Singer,” courtesy of Jewish Currents.
  • The Fig Tree Books blog launched a new feature: American Jewish Experience (AJE) Around the Web.
  • “Commenting on the [Jewish Quarterly/Wingate Prize] longlist, Director of the prize Rachel Lasserson says, ‘This generation of writers was born into stories of epic scale. Our longlist reflects their struggle to make sense of these huge stories.’”
  • With help from one of his children, Library Journal remembers author Howard Fast on the centenary of his birth.
  • And on my other blog this week: “Midrash on Happiness.”
  • Shabbat shalom.

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    Tevye in Amherst: A Glimpse into the Great Jewish Books Program

    I have known Hannah Elbaum literally since before she was born. Hannah’s mom and I have been fast friends since our freshman year in college; I was a bridesmaid in Hannah’s parents’ wedding; and I was among the first to hear that Hannah was on the way (and to meet newborn Hannah in the hospital).

    So you can imagine how I began kvelling when I heard that Hannah had been accepted to the 2014 Great Jewish Books Summer Program for high school students at the National Yiddish Book Center. I asked Hannah if she would be kind enough to write up a guest post about her experience, in part because I wish I could attend the program myself. How I would love to spend an entire week in beautiful Amherst, Massachusetts, reading, discussing, and arguing about Jewish literature! When Hannah agreed to contribute her insights, I suggested that she might share with us a typical day in the program. She complied, and I’m delighted to present this glimpse into what was apparently a vibrant and memorable week.

    Hannah Elbaum is a high school senior, eagerly awaiting the next chapter in her life. She was a Diller Teen Fellow of 2012-2013, and a Rising Voices Fellow of 2013-2014. Currently, she is the president of the senior youth group at Temple Beth Elohim in Wellesley, Massachusetts, where she has held a variety of leadership roles and is an active participant in the North American Federation of Temple Youth-Northeast Region.

    Please welcome Hannah Elbaum! Continue reading ›

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    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • A thoughtful review of Nora Gold’s Fields of Exile, which you’ve heard about here before.
  • Interesting call: “For this special issue of Prooftexts on Jewish Literature/World Literature, we seek papers that address Jewish literary multilingualism, translation, and circulation. Essays should combine theoretical and methodological concerns with readings of Jewish-language texts to illustrate the productive intersections of Jewish literature with the discourse on world literature.”
  • On the Lilith blog, Talia Lavin writes “On Mothers, Sisters, Narrative and War.”
  • “The interdisciplinary symposium ‘Global Yiddish Culture, 1938 – 1948’ invites historians, literary scholars, sociologists, cinema and theatre scholars to think about the nature of Yiddish culture that developed during this difficult period in Jewish history.”
  • Finally, I’m sad to say that this poem of mine, “Questions for the Critics,” is once again relevant.
  • Shabbat shalom.

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