Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen
Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • “What really brings Ayelet Tsabari’s stories to life are her characters, people that you rarely meet in Israeli fiction.” The Times of Israel‘s Ellis Shuman’s verdict on Israeli-Canadian Tsabari’s The Best Place on Earth: “Highly recommended.” I agree!
  • “3G” writer and scholar Anthony Levin is among the panelists featured in this recording from Australia, “Keeping the Memory and the History of the Shoah Alive.”
  • New Yorkers: “LABA is a non-religious Jewish house of study and culture laboratory at the 14th Street Y. Every year LABA selects a group of around 10 fellows — a mix of artists, writers, dancers, musicians, actors and others — to join us for a yearlong study of classical Jewish texts centered around a theme, and then interpret these texts in their work which is featured in LABAlive events and the quarterly online journal.” The theme for 2013-14 will be “Mother,” and fellowship applications are due by July 31, 2013.
  • The Yiddish Book Center has an interesting project under way, “a series of ongoing interviews with relatives of Yiddish authors,” with some examples already online.
  • Last, but by no means least: a blog post by one of the JCC Boston Diller Teen Fellows, “selected yearly based on their leadership aptitude, commitment to Jewish learning, interest in exploring their connection to Israel, and passion for serving their community.” I’ve known Hannah since before she was born–I’m kvelling!
  • Shabbat shalom.

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen
    Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • Coming soon! Open: The Festival of New Jewish Theater at the 14th Street Y in New York will take place June 10-30. I attended last year, and I’m looking forward to dropping by again.
  • The Forward previews a slew of new Jewish books for summer.
  • As I think I’ve mentioned, one of the books I’m hoping to read this summer is Rutu Modan’s The Property (trans. Jessica Cohen), which appears to belong to the ever-growing corpus of “3G” literature. As noted in this week’s Publishers Weekly profile: “Inspired by her family origins and family secrets, [Modan] wanted to write a story about a Jewish grandmother who, with the help of her granddaughter, reclaims her property in Poland that was seized during the war.”
  • Ari Shavit’s My Promised Land: The Triumph and Tragedy of Israel, which will be published in November, is the inaugural winner of the Natan Book Award. (I happen to be reading an electronic galley of this book at the moment.)
  • Win a bundle of Jewish-interest books from the Jewish Book Council.
  • Shabbat shalom.

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • “The Greatest Living Hebrew Writer Is Arab”–find out who this writer is, according to The Tower magazine.
  • “After three-and-a-half jam-packed years, Jewish Ideas Daily is embarked on another exciting adventure.” Learn more about the soon-to-be-launched Mosaic.
  • Can you sum up your Jewish dad in six words?
  • Jane Yolen explains how she came to write The Devil’s Arithmetic: “I had lunch with one of my editors, who happened to be a rabbi’s wife. She said, ‘I know you’re Jewish, but you don’t write about anything Jewish—it’s time you start.'”
  • An utterly moving essay by a son of an Auschwitz survivor.
  • Shabbat shalom.

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • The May Jewish Book Carnival is now online. Check out the recommended links for lots of recent news, reviews, and interviews.
  • Rabbi Rachel Barenblat offers reflections on motherhood and context for her new book of poems over on ZEEK.
  • Q&A with Rutu Modan, whose forthcoming graphic novel, The Property, is on my TBR list.
  • The Whole Megillah presents a Q&A with author Lesléa Newman.
  • Last, but maybe not least: I’m offering a free, signed copy of Quiet Americans to the winner of this Short Story Month Giveaway.
  • Shabbat shalom!

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen
    Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • Beautiful essay on the “spiritual fitness regimen” that Michelle Brafman adopted before her daughter’s Bat Mitzvah.
  • Events for Anglo-Israeli writers near Jerusalem, coordinated by Judy Labensohn.
  • The KlezKanada Poetry Retreat is slated for August 19-25, 2013. Those who are between 16 and 35 years of age may apply for scholarships (deadline: May 1, 2013, so hurry!).
  • On Jewish Ideas Daily, Diane Cole recommends a translation of Israeli author Nava Semel’s Paper Bride.
  • JTA is looking for a Feature Writer.
  • Last, but not least: I’m grateful to the Young Friends Book Club of the Museum of Jewish Heritage here in New York for hosting Quiet Americans and me next month.
  • Shabbat shalom.

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen
    Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • A new issue of JewishFiction.net is always a cause for celebration.
  • Some background on the Sophie Brody Medal for outstanding achievement in Jewish literature (includes a shout-out to Quiet Americans!).
  • Mazel tov to Francesca Segal, winner of the 2013 Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature for her novel The Innocents.
  • Some context for how I discovered Atar Hadari’s stories “about how a man loses pieces of his life on a religious kibbutz in Israel.”
  • This weekend, BookTV will air coverage from the “[email protected]” conference that was held last month to honor Philip Roth.
  • Shabbat shalom.