Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

  • Nathan Englander’s story in this week’s New Yorker is behind the paywall, but anyone can read this interview with Englander about the story (“What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank,” the title story in Englander’s forthcoming collection); Raymond Carver; and how Englander’s efforts in playwriting and translation have influenced his fiction.
  • Weekend reading: the latest issue of JewishFiction.net.
  • Glad to see a revival of Josh Lambert’s new books column on Tablet.
  • Four fun facts about my own year in Jewish books.
  • “The Book of Life’s Canadian Correspondent Anne Dublin interviews author and filmmaker David Bezmogis about his development as a writer and his new novel The Free World.”
  • There is so much great stuff on Barbara Krasner’s “Whole Megillah” site (“the writer’s resource for Jewish-themed children’s books”) that I’m just going to send you over to the home page.
  • Israeli author Moshe Sakal was thrown off a literary panel in France a few days ago when a Palestinian poet refused to share the stage with him. Nice, n’est-ce pas? The event has received appallingly little attention–and the news is traveling slowly at that–but I’ve been able to track down some live-blogging coverage (in French.) Meantime, I’ve also found the author’s “Writing Rules,” apparently published in connection with his University of Iowa International Writers Program affiliation this fall.
  • Shabbat shalom!

    My Year in Jewish Books

    Looking back at my reading for 2011 (thank you, Goodreads!), I can see that I do not and would not ever limit my reading to “Jewish books” exclusively. (By the way, I define “Jewish books” as books with substantive Jewish content/themes. In my view, non-Jewish authors can write “Jewish books.” And Jewish authors can write books that don’t strike me as particularly Jewish. I read several of those books this year, too.)

    But this year, as usual, I did read quite a few books that fall within the “Jewish book” category. And, as an advocate for Jewish literature, I’m proud of that. Moreover, although it wasn’t intentional, when I revisit the record of my reading (again, thanks, Goodreads!), I find that there are 18 such titles.

    Below, you will find these books presented in the order in which I read them. Please note that, where appropriate, I have included links to reviews/essays/newsy items I have written; interviews I have conducted; and chat transcripts in which you will see I participated. I have also disclosed how I obtained each book: P (purchase), G (gift), R (complimentary review copy), L (library). NB: Later this week, I’ll publish a “meta-post” with some thoughts and observations based on this one.

    Meantime, maybe you will find a title or two (or 18) for your own reading list. Or for a gift for someone else.  (more…)

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Shabbat shalom!

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

  • Beautiful essay by Thomas Israel Hopkins on Tablet, on grieving, Jewishly, for a non-Jewish parent.
  • Anna Solomon’s Little Bride continues to attract lots of attention. See Judy Bolton-Fasman’s post for The Forward‘s Sisterhood blog for some especially interesting thoughts.
  • Kevin Haworth revisits “The Catskills” for Defunct, “a literary repository for the ages.”
  • Poet and professor Rick Chess reflects on Amichai, Asheville, and more.
  • Last call! Come join us on Sunday afternoon to talk about “Looking Backward: History, the Holocaust, and Literary Writing in the Third Generation.”
  • Shabbat shalom!

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

  • Last week, I mentioned that I wouldn’t make it to the Amos Oz event at the 92nd Street Y. But Andrew Silow-Carroll was there.
  • Fantastic interview with author Allegra Goodman on her own (and others’) Jewish fiction. (via @realdelia)
  • Beth Kissileff reports on an International Conference on the Life and Work of Aharon Appelfeld, held October 26 and 27 at the University of Pennsylvania. Appelfeld was in attendance.
  • Over on the Literary Commentary blog, D.G. Myers argues that fantasy is a genre of Christianity.
  • A reminder that I’ll be speaking as a guest of the Jewish Historical Society of New York on Sunday, November 13. The topic: “Looking Backward: History, the Holocaust, and Literary Writing in the Third Generation.”
  • Shabbat shalom!

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

  • I wasn’t able to make it to Amos Oz’s appearance at the 92nd Street Y this week, but while he was in town, Oz recorded this broadcast with Brian Lehrer, and I hope to get to that very soon!
  • Another big prize for Charles Foran’s biography of Mordecai Richler.
  • More about Irène Némirovsky.
  • Némirovsky gets a mention in Trina Robbins’s post for the Jewish Book Council, too. Robbins is the author of Lily Renée: Escape Artist, “a comic by a Jewish woman about a Jewish woman who drew comics.” (Lily Renée was also part of the history of the Kindertransport trains.)
  • The second part of “A Jewish Writer in America,” excerpted from a talk that Saul Bellow gave in 1984, is now online.
  • The praise keeps coming for short-story writer Edith Pearlman.
  • Shabbat shalom!