Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

  • Fascinating research on truth and lies about the origins of the famous Leon Uris novel Exodus. (via Jewish Ideas Daily)
  • In which you’ll read about Leon Wieseltier, David Grossman…and Occupy Wall Street.
  • Interesting reaction to the recent announcements of the latest National Book Award finalists and the Man Booker Prize winner in Eric Herschthal’s “The Agony & Ecstasy of Jewish Book Awards.”
  • This week, I picked up a copy of Wayne Hoffman’s Sweet Like Sugar, which will be the focus of the next Jewish Book Council Twitter Book Club (November 8). And this week, JewishJournal.com posted a review of the novel.
  • Shabbat shalom, everyone.

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

  • As I’ve already mentioned on my other blog, I hope that by the time The New York Review of Books publishes the second part of “A Jewish Writer in America,” which reflects a talk originally given by Saul Bellow in 1988, I’ll have been able to digest fully part one.
  • On the occasion of the release of MetaMaus, Art Spiegelman’s combination book/DVD about the creation of his famous Maus, Ruth Franklin writes: “What MetaMaus makes clear is that Maus, like the works of W.G. Sebald, exists somewhere outside of the genres as they are normally defined: We might call it ‘testimonially based Holocaust representation.’ But no matter what it is called, it gives the lie to the critics of Holocaust literature (as well as certain writers of it) who have insisted that either everything must be true or nothing is true.”
  • From The Literary Saloon’s M.A. Orthofer: “It’s always fun when literature and politics get mixed up, and Giulio Meotti’s wacky op-ed at Ynet, wondering: ‘Why do most of Israel’s prominent writers go easy on Jewish State’s enemies ?’ — which apparently amounts to Israel’s literary tragedy — is a fine example.” I agree with Orthofer that the argument isn’t handled well. But I’m less “indifferent” to that argument than he is.
  • New exhibit at the Yiddish Book Center in western Massachusetts: Isaac Bashevis Singer and his Artists. Runs October 16, 2011-February 15, 2012.
  • Andrew Silow-Carroll highlights an amusing anecdote related in Dwight Garner’s review of the new memoir by author Bruce Jay Friedman.
  • Shabbat shalom!

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

  • Ruth Franklin, on “Élisabeth Gille’s Devastating Account of Her Mother, Irène Némirovsky.”
  • Commentary‘s archive is going to the University of Texas. Says The New York Times: “The archive, which spans 1945 to 1995, includes letters by and to Bernard Malamud, Norman Mailer, Amos Oz, Elie Wiesel and Isaac Bashevis Singer, as well as the revisions of essays written for the magazine by George Orwell, Pearl S. Buck and Jean-Paul Sartre.”
  • Just in time for Rosh Hashanah: a new issue of JewishFiction.net, featuring, in the editor’s words, “thirteen beautiful, moving, and thought-provoking stories (originally written in Yiddish, Hebrew, or English) that touch in various ways on the themes of faith, spiritual searching, and/or religious observance.”
  • Love this comprehensive discussion of André Aciman’s new book on Tablet.
  • Randy Susan Meyers, whose novel, The Murderer’s Daughters, I’m reading right now, is one of the fiction writers featured in the latest issue of 614, an ezine from the Hadassah-Brandeis Institute.
  • Looking forward to reading through the latest (September-October) issues of the Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL)”News” and “Reviews” publications.
  • Shabbat shalom!

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    OK, Shabbat is still a day away, but I’m going to be offline for awhile (click here for an explanation), so I wanted to post this today.

    Shabbat shalom, everyone. See you next week.

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

  • Next week, I’ll be publishing an interview with debut novelist Anna Solomon. But this week, you can read Anna’s fascinating essay on Jewish mail-order brides on Tablet.
  • Poet Samuel Menashe has passed away.
  • Some fall nonfiction titles of Jewish interest to anticipate.
  • Mazel tov to David Bezmozgis, author most recently of The Free World, which has been shortlisted for the Flaherty-Dunnan First Novel Prize.
  • Eric Herschthal compiles a Jewishly-focused reading list for President Obama.
  • Shabbat shalom, with an emphasis on “shalom,” especially for our community in southern Israel.

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

  • One of this week’s highlights was the latest Jewish Book Council “Twitter Book Club”. Up for discussion this time: Deborah E. Lipstadt’s new book, The Eichmann Trial. If you missed the chat, you can read the transcript (the author participated).
  • Another fascinating piece by Adam Kirsch, this time about Israeli writer Lea Goldberg, whose novel And This Is the Light (trans. Barbara Harshav) is available from Toby Press.
  • New podcasts on the Association of Jewish Libraries website!
  • A writing prompt led to this lovely pre-Holy Days post from Frume Sarah.
  • I am going to have to see this film.
  • This week marked the six-month anniversary of my short-story collection, Quiet Americans, which was released last January. Read my “half-birthday” reflections here.
  • Shabbat shalom, everyone.