Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen
  • In this podcast from the Yiddish Book Center, “Ilan Stavans sits down with Josh Lambert to answer questions about the concept behind his documentary-style fotonovela, [email protected]:53am, a fictional meditation of the two hours before the 1994 terrorist attack on the Jewish community center in Buenos Aires.” The [email protected]:53am exhibit at the Yiddish Book Center runs into early November.
  • Coming soon: The Toronto Jewish Book Festival (June 4-7, 2012), featuring, on June 6, a celebration of JewishFiction.net’s second anniversary.
  • If you missed the latest meeting of the Jewish Book Council’s Twitter Book Club (as I did), you can read the transcript of the chat with Ramona Ausubel, author of No One Is Here Except All of Us.
  • Zackary Sholem Berger’s Tablet article introduced me to a slice of Jewish writing that is utterly new to me: a sort of underground Hasidic literary culture.
  • Still waiting to read my story collection, Quiet Americans? Here’s another opportunity to win a free copy. Simply leave a comment on Christi Craig’s generous Q&A with me about the book.
  • Shabbat shalom, and Chag Shavuot Sameach.

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Once again, there’s so much to share this week. Let’s get started.

  • You may recall how much I admired HHhH, the Laurent Binet novel translated by Sam Taylor. Now, I’m thinking that I should try to pick up a copy of the original French edition. Plus: In The New Yorker, James Wood weighs in with a review that’s definitely worth reading (and thinking about).
  • Mazel tov to Israel on the recent honor it received at the International Book Fair of Buenos Aires.
  • “The Philip Roth Society proudly announces a call for papers for [email protected], a conference event organized, in conjunction with the Newark Preservation & Landmarks Committee, to mark the 80th birthday of Philip Roth. It will take place on March 18-19, 2013, at the Robert Treat Hotel in Newark, NJ.” Proposal deadline is September 1, 2012.
  • On The Whole Megillah, Nancy K. Miller answers questions on the writing process behind her award-winning family memoir, What They Saved: Pieces of a Jewish Past.
  • This week brought us the May Jewish Book Carnival. Thanks to the Jewish Book Council’s blog (The ProsenPeople) for hosting.
  • Sixth & I, “a historic synagogue and center for arts, entertainment, and cultural experiences in downtown DC,” is looking for a Cultural Programming Associate. And the Boston-based Jewish Women’s Archive (JWA) is advertising a paid internship in communications & social media.
  • Shabbat shalom.

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    It’s time for the weekly batch of Internet finds of Jewish literary interest.

  • Let’s begin here: Did you know that Cynthia Ozick has written a novel set in a Jewish day school?
  • On the Jewish flavor of the works of Maurice Sendak.
  • Summer internship opportunity (albeit unpaid) with the Jewish Book Council.
  • And a job announcement from the Forward, which is looking for an Arts & Culture Editor.
  • Finally, a personal note: This week marked the 30th anniversary of my becoming a Bat Mitzvah. The secular and Hebrew calendars seem to be aligned, because this week’s Torah portion, Parashat Emor, was mine. Last year, New Vilna Review published Emor,” a poem inspired by my attendance at a more recent May Bat Mitzvah ceremony.
  • Shabbat shalom.

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen
  • The new issue of Moment magazine features Jewish fiction throughout. See especially the symposium, “Is There Such a Thing as Jewish Fiction?” (with a preface from the magazine’s new Fiction Editor, Alan Cheuse); the winning entries in the Publish-a-Kid Contest; and, in this (atypical) free digital copy of the entire issue, Racelle Rosett’s short story, “Shidach.”
  • Another short story well worth your time: Adam Berlin’s “Aryan Jew.”
  • And speaking of short stories: Here’s a chance to win a free copy of Edith Pearlman’s Binocular Vision (or a copy of my collection, Quiet Americans).
  • Adam Kirsch has reviewed Laurent Binet’s HHhH (trans. Sam Taylor).
  • My latest micro-essay, which takes place within the Centre de Documentation Juive Contemporaine (CDJC) in Paris, appears in the current issue of Hippocampus Magazine.
  • If you’re in Israel, you’ll want to take note of the extraordinary program and presenters for “Tsuris and Other Literary Pleasures,” a free creative-writing conference that begins on Sunday.
  • Shabbat shalom.

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen
  • I’m sorry that it took me nearly all month to discover that the “Jewesses with Attitude” blog has been presenting a series of posts about and by American Jewish women poets to celebrate National Poetry Month.
  • The URJ’s Rabbi Rick Jacobs published a beautiful piece this week for Yom HaZikaron/Yom HaAtzmaut that spotlighted the memory of Uri Grossman, son of Israeli author David Grossman.
  • I have been enjoying author Debra Spark’s guest posts over on the Jewish Book Council’s blog (The ProsenPeople).
  • When you read Judy Bolton-Fasman’s “A Jubana Mother Gives Advice to Her Tragically Gringa Daughter” you, too, will be eager to read Judy’s memoir-in-progress.
  • One of this week’s personal highlights: discovering this sensitive and generous review of Quiet Americans on Amazon.
  • Shabbat shalom.