Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

Every Friday, My Machberet presents a set of Jewish Literary Links to close out the week.

  • First, and in case you missed it, I devoted a post on my “Practicing Writing” blog earlier this week to some reflections on Israeli author Shani Boianjiu’s forthcoming novel, The People of Forever Are Not Afraid.
  • Next, the latest Jewish Book Carnival went live earlier this week. This month’s Carnival marks the project’s second anniversary.
  • Lilith fiction editor (and prolific author in her own right) Yona Zeldis McDonough is the Association of Jewish Libraries Facebook Writer-in-Residence for the month of July.
  • On Monday, the Jewish Book Council hosted author Francesca Segal, who chatted with readers via Twitter about her recasting of Edith Wharton’s The Age of Innocence in her own recent novel, The Innocents. You can read the transcript if you missed the fun. And take note of the next JBC Twitter chat, featuring Joshua Henkin and The World Without You in September.
  • Finally, yours truly has a piece up on The Forward’s Arty Semite blog, “Remembering Munich, in Fact and Fiction.” (That would be in my fiction: in “Homecomings,” a story in Quiet Americans.
  • Shabbat shalom.

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen
    Every Friday, My Machberet presents a set of Jewish Literary Links to close out the week.

  • A hearty Mazal Tov to Elie Wiesel, who has been named the winner of the 2012 Kenyon Review Award for Literary Achievement.
  • LABA: House of Study, “a non-religious beit midrash for culture-makers located at the 14th Street Y in New York City,” is looking for fellows for the 2012-13 year. Fellows may be “culture-makers from any creative field. Previous fellows have included dancers, actors, visual artists, theater directors, musicians and writers, though we are not limited to these categories.” The theme for the upcoming year is “EAT.” Applications are due by July 30, 2012, and there is no fee to apply.
  • The Yiddish Book Center (Amherst, Mass.) “seeks a Communications & Visitor Services Assistant to supervise docents, coordinate group tours, assist with administration of public programs, maintain social media presence, and assist with outreach.”
  • “For a special issue of Studies in American Jewish Literature, we seek critical and scholarly essays on Jewish American poetry–Jewish poetry written in America, American poetry written by Jews on matters Jewish, or American poetry written in Jewish languages, including Yiddish, Hebrew, and Ladino.” Deadline: January 1, 2013.
  • And in case you missed the mention on my other blog: I’ve gone back to school. Back to Hebrew school, that is.
  • Shabbat shalom!

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen
    Every Friday, My Machberet presents a set of Jewish Literary Links to close out the week.

  • First up: I’m currently reading Francesca Segal’s The Innocents, a novel that updates Edith Wharton’s The Age of Innocence and transplants it to Jewish London. You still have time to read a copy yourself before the Jewish Book Council’s Twitter chat with the author, which is slated for July 16.
  • Also looking just a bit ahead: If you’re in New York, you may want to catch “Four Jewish Guys: Poetry and Performance,” scheduled for July 19 and featuring Jake Marmer, Jay Michaelson, Yehoshua November, and Philip Terman.
  • Not easy to read, but noteworthy nonetheless: “The American Girl in the Bunker,” a first-person account of a volunteer from New York serving in an IDF paratrooper unit–and dealing with rockets from Gaza.
  • Very different material, but also worth your time: Deborah Eisenberg’s new short story, “Cross Off and Move On.”
  • And over on Bagels and Books, there’s a nice recap of this spring’s Writers’ Festival in Jerusalem.
  • Shabbat shalom!

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Happy to share some pre-Shabbat literary links.

  • If you’re in the NYC area and looking for a book group to join, you may want to consider this one, from the Center for Jewish History: a book club that’s free and open to the public. The club will kick off on July 16 with a discussion of Ellen Ullman’s By Blood. More info here.
  • MyJewishLearning.com is hiring an Editor. (This job is based in New York.)
  • You still have a few days to enter a giveaway and win a copy of Ann Koffsky’s book for children, Noah’s Swim-a-Thon.
  • The ever-instructive Adam Kirsch, on “John Updike’s Jewish Novels.”
  • Finally, even if you don’t click through and read anything else I’m pointing you to, please read Judy Bolton-Fasman’s simply superb–and beautifully written–“Letter to Alice Walker.”
  • Shabbat shalom.

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen
    There is so much excellent content to share with you this week. Let’s get right to it.

  • First, one of the books I’m anticipating with considerable interest this fall is Shani Boianjiu’s The People of Forever Are Not Afraid. Boianjiu, an Israeli, wrote the book in English. This week, The New Yorker published an excerpt as well as a Web-only Q&A with the author.
  • Next: You’ve seen me mention JewishFiction.net here before. This week, The Whole Megillah ran a Q&A with JewishFiction.net’s editor, Dr. Nora Gold. I was especially impressed by Gold’s pride in her journal’s “high level of inclusiveness and diversity….For years I have been deeply concerned about the divisions, divisiveness, and polarizations within the Jewish world: between the different streams of Judaism, between religious/secular, left/right, Ashkenazi/Mizrahi, and Israel/Diaspora, to name just a few. So in Jewish Fiction.net we have made a point of publishing fiction by authors who are secular and religious (“religious” encompassing all streams of Judaism), right- and left-wing, Ashkenazi and Mizrahi, old and young, female and male, economically privileged and disadvantaged, community-affiliated and community-alienated, LGBTI and straight, and from Israel and the Diaspora. It is our hope that, in this way, Jewish Fiction.net can help bring Jews together in spite of the differences between us. We all have a common language as Jews, and Jewish literature belongs to all of us. So Jewish Fiction.net is a place where all Jewish voices can be heard.”
  • Superb Tablet essay by a young woman currently on a Birthright trip in Israel, regarding her experiences with anti-Semitism (yes, here in the United States! in the 21st century!).
  • In case you missed it, Linda K. Wertheimer has curated an especially strong Jewish Book Carnival this month.
  • Attention, graduate students! Administered by the Philip Roth Society, “[t]he Siegel/McDaniel Award recognizes high-quality work from graduate students written on any aspect of Philip Roth’s writing in the past year (ending June 1). We recommend that faculty urge strong students to submit papers and we welcome submissions from members and non-members alike.” There’s no entry fee indicated, and the deadline is September 1, 2012. “The winner of the Siegel/McDaniel Award receives: 1) a $250 cash award; 2) a complimentary one-year membership (or renewal) in the Philip Roth Society, including a year’s subscription to Philip Roth Studies; and 3) an opportunity to work with the editor of Philip Roth Studies to publish an expanded version of the essay in the journal.”
  • Shabbat shalom!

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen
  • The latest Rockower Awards–for excellence in Jewish journalism–have been announced. Mazel tov to all of the honorees. Special kudos to some bylines/pubs/websites you’ve seen me reference here on My Machberet: Judy Bolton-Fasman, Andrew Silow-Caroll/New Jersey Jewish Week, The Jewish Week, Jewish Women’s Archive, & JTA.
  • Coming in 2015: a new Jewish arts festival.
  • Much sooner, the house in Brazil where refugee author Stefan Zweig and his wife committed suicide together in 1942–the Casa Stefan Zweig–will open as a museum. Benjamin Ivry revisits this author’s history for The Forward.
  • The Jewish Journal‘s Jonathan Kirsch offers some suggestions for summer reading.
  • Themed “Translation/Transformation,” the new Ilanot Review features work by Etgar Keret and Margot Singer and an interview with Evan Fallenberg, among other wonderful items. (I’m thrilled that Lebensraum,” a story from Quiet Americans, is also part of this issue.)
  • Shabbat shalom!