Sunday Sentence

Another Sunday in which I participate in David Abrams’s “Sunday Sentence” project, which asks others to share the best sentence(s) we’ve read during the past week, “out of context and without commentary.”
Golden-Retriever“This is what dogs teach us: to love and to risk losing and to love again. I’ve met people who never want another dog after losing their first one, and I’m sympathetic. But what if after our first heartbreak we gave up on love? What if after the first fight with a lover we shielded ourselves? We would be protected, yes, but we’d also be done living.”

Tatjana Soli, “Picking Up the Scent of Bliss”

Sunday Sentence

APOLLINAIRE Alcools
Another Sunday in which I participate in David Abrams’s “Sunday Sentence” project, which asks others to share the best sentence(s) we’ve read during the past week, “out of context and without commentary.”

“Vienne la nuit sonne l’heure//Les jours s’en vont je demeure”

–Source: Guillaume Apollinaire’s “Le Pont Mirabeau,” which I revisited this week when @JenniferSolheim reminded me of this recording of the poet reading it aloud. Merveilleux! (I have a hard time with the “out of context and without commentary bit, as you can see!)

Sunday Sentence

veritas_logoAnother Sunday in which I participate in David Abrams’s “Sunday Sentence” project, which asks others to share the best sentence(s) we’ve read during the past week, “out of context and without commentary.”

“‘Your acceptance into Harvard is one of the shining accomplishments of my life,’ she said, ‘and I’ll be damned if I see you give it away.'”

Justin Porter’s essay in the latest issue of The New York Times‘s “Education Life” section.

Sunday Sentence Debut

TPR-205Oh, what a creature of habit I am. I try to adhere to a nice, structured blogging schedule, and weekend Practicing Writing posts aren’t part of it.

But today I have to break with routine and participate in David Abrams’s “Sunday Sentence” project, which asks others to share the best sentence(s) we’ve read during the past week, “out of context and without commentary.” So, without further ado:

“I breathed in the night air that was or was not laced with anachronistic blossoms and felt the small thrill I always felt to a lesser or greater degree when I looked at Manhattan’s skyline and the innumerable illuminated windows and the liquid sapphire and ruby of traffic on the FDR Drive and the present absence of the towers.”

–from “False Spring” by Ben Lerner, in The Paris Review (Summer 2013)