Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen
Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • In a smart blog post (does she write anything that isn’t smart?) sparked by a current Kveller series, Rebecca Klempner asks readers to share book/magazine suggestions for enhancing the “G-d Talk” with kids. (She also offers a few suggestions of her own.)
  • A lovely poem by David Y.B. Kaufmann, “Walking to Shul.”
  • People are talking (well, blogging & tweeting, anyway) about Michael Wex’s new project: an indiegogo campaign to fund “a translation of Joseph Opatoshu’s unbelievably great Yiddish novel, In the Forests of Poland, into an English as compulsively readable as the original.”
  • “The Hadassah-Brandeis Institute (HBI) at Brandeis University is looking for a Communications Coordinator. The person supports the communications efforts of the HBI and 614 eZine websites; creating and executing the e-mail campaigns; improving social media visibility; event promotion and outreach; analyzing web traffic and trends; and developing online partnerships.”
  • And on a more personal note: I hope that you’ll take a few moments to read my sister’s first essay/post for The Jewish Week‘s New Normal blog.
  • Shabbat shalom.

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen
    Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • From the The Jewish Week: “Elie Wiesel’s ‘Open House'”.
  • The Canadian Jewish News catches up with JewishFiction.Net and its editor, Nora Gold, who has a new novel coming next year (I can’t wait to read it!).
  • Even if I hadn’t had the privilege of meeting YIVO Executive Director Jonathan Brent this week, his important reflections on “the last books” for Jewish Ideas Daily would have made this list.
  • A few words about “Germany After 1945: A Society Confronts Anti-Semitism, Racism and Neo-Nazism,” a traveling exhibition that is making its U.S. debut in NYC.
  • And my review of “Holocaust Literature: A History and Guide,” by David Roskies and Naomi Diamant, in The Forward.
  • Shabbat shalom.

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of Jewish news, primarily of the literary variety, from around the Web.

  • I’m looking forward to delving into this special “Writing from Israel” poetry and translation feature from The Bakery.
  • Thrilled to see this interview with my former poetry teacher, Matthew Lippman, on The Whole Megillah.
  • See also an interview with Israeli poet Moshe Dor and translator Barbara Goldberg, courtesy of Moment magazine’s blog.
  • On Tablet: New translations of powerful Holocaust poetry by Chava Rosenfarb.
  • D.G. Myers interprets Howard Jacobson – and reviews Jacobson’s Zoo Time – for Jewish Ideas Daily.
  • Shabbat shalom.

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen
    Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of Jewish news, primarily of the literary variety, from around the Web.

  • Yiddish Book Center Fellow Jordan Kutzik reports on a recent UNESCO symposium, “The Permanence of Yiddish,” in Paris.
  • Over on Jewish Ideas Daily, D.G. Myers reviews the year just past in Jewish books.
  • Clever review of Oy! Only Six? Why Not More? Six-Word Memoirs on Jewish Life (I’m a proud contributor).
  • Something unexpected happened when Vanessa Hidary (“the Hebrew Mamita”) asked a pop-up bookstore at Limmud to stock her memoir.
  • Last, but not least: first issue of Gandy Dancer, a new literary journal based at SUNY-Geneseo, features an interview with me about Quiet Americans.
  • Shabbat shalom.

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of Jewish news, primarily of the literary variety, from around the Web.

  • I’m going to have to reread this article about Jewish-American poetry – I somehow can’t quite buy the suggestion that “all poetry is Jewish.”
  • “In honor of the centennial of Abraham Sutzkever’s birth, SLS Lithuania is proud to announce a poetry translation contest, to be judged by Ed Hirsch.” Note that there is an entry fee for this contest. “The winner will receive a full scholarship at SLS Lithuania, as well as a $500 travel stipend. The winning entry will be translated into Lithuanian, and read at a celebration in Vilnius on the centennial, on July 15, 2013.” (via The Forward)
  • In the latest issue of their online journal, the fellows from LABA: House of Study “take a close look at the intersection between food and power and how Jacob used his knowledge of this connection to pull off one of the biggest heists in Jewish tradition.”
  • I missed what looks to have been an intriguing event at the Center for Jewish History on the subject of Jewish participation as “culture brokers” in publishing-the book trade. Luckily, there’s video from the evening, which I hope to watch this weekend.
  • Et tu, National Geographic?
  • Shabbat shalom.

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of Jewish literary news from around the Web.

  • First up: The Natan Award is an exciting new prize for a nonfiction book-in-progress. This award “brings Natan’s values of infusing Jewish life with creativity and meaning into the intellectual arena by supporting and promoting a breakthrough book on Jewish themes intended for mainstream audiences.” No entry fee. Applications due December 3.
  • The latest issue of Jewish Book World is now online, in its entirety.
  • Poet Gerald Stern is profiled in The Forward.
  • The Yiddish Book Center has announced a new Translation Fellowship Program for those with at least an intermediate-level proficiency in Yiddish. “Beginning in the winter of 2012, the Center will select five Translation Fellows who will receive yearlong mentorship and training to complete book-length projects in Yiddish translation. As an incentive to produce works of the highest caliber, each Fellow will receive a grant of $5,000.” There is no application fee. Application deadline is November 15, 2012.
  • Finally, I am delighted that my home congregation has added live-streamed services to its offerings. Now I can much more easily share something that’s so important to me with all of you. For example: our senior rabbi’s most recent Rosh Hashanah sermon, archived for everyone to absorb. Let’s just say that there was a lot I agreed with in what he said about Israel this year.
  • Shabbat shalom.

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen
    Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of Jewish literary news from around the Web.

  • First up: this month’s Jewish Book Carnival, hosted by Needle in the Bookstacks, a blog from the Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion (HUC-JIR) librarians.
  • Many short-story treats this week, starting with this gem from The New Yorker: a 1970 story by Isaac Bashevis Singer (“Job”), plus notes about the translation.
  • A brand-new issue of JewishFiction.net is now available for our reading pleasure.
  • I read it first in the print magazine, but it looks as though Moment has made Edith Pearlman’s short story, “The Kargman Affliction,” available online, too.
  • Adam Kirsch writes about Amoz Oz’s reissued story collection, Where the Jackals Howl (trans. Nicholas De Lange).
  • Shabbat shalom.

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen
    Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of Jewish literary news from around the Web.

  • First up is an event taking place this Sunday–in Yiddish–at NYC’s Center for Jewish History: “The YIVO Institute for Jewish Research together with the Congress for Jewish Culture, CYCO Books, the Forward Association, the Jewish Labor Committee, and the Workmen’s Circle invite you to attend a commemoration of the sixtieth anniversary of the death of Soviet Yiddish writers and other members of the Jewish Anti-Fascist Committee at the hands of Stalin. There will be several short films based on the poetry of Perets Markish; Boris Sandler, editor of the Forward, will read his own poems; well-known singers Hy Wolfe and Paula Teitelbaum will sing and recite poetry; Shane Baker will recite poetry; David Mandelbaum of New Yiddish Rep and Paul Glasser of YIVO will read prose. The emcee will be Tom Bird of Queens College.”
  • Lots to think about in Ilana Sichel’s review of Anouk Markovits’s I Am Forbidden.
  • In somewhat related news: Zackary Sholem Berger profiles “the writers and editors behind the astonishing rise of Orthodox magazines and fiction.”
  • The passing of businessman and philanthropist Sami Rohr this week has been noted in many quarters. Among the most lovely tributes is Gal Beckerman’s.
  • Finally, yet another contest from The Whole Megillah: “Yom Kippur often gets us thinking about our departed loved ones and our own lives. Perhaps you’ve even written your reflections about your family or yourself. If you have a memoir manuscript in progress, consider submitting its first page to The Whole Megillah First Page Competition for Memoir.”
  • Shabbat shalom.