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Friday Finds for Writers

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Writing-related resources, news, and reflections to peruse over the weekend.

  • Leonard Cohen “could have had a very fine career as a novelist, but he got sick of not making any money.” So explains Pamela Erens in a terrific piece about Cohen and his novels.
  • Superb essay by Tayari Jones on the work and relevance of Ann Petry (1908-1997), whose first novel, The Street, “sold a staggering 1.5 million copies.”
  • Encountered in Amtrak’s own magazine on the train to Boston last weekend: a lovely piece by Laura van den Berg about her relationship with her husband (Paul Yoon), which began “at a writers’ conference in Vermont” and continued, in part, with a little help from Amtrak itself.
  • Donna Talarico’s article on “how to increase accessibility for for online writers and readers” seems significant and timely. I recognize that I have a great deal to learn on this subject; I have questions, beginning with this one: When I hyperlink text (as I did for “Donna Talarico’s article”), is that accessible? Or should I be sure to write and hyperlink “learn more” (or something similar) for each item that I link to? Advice?
  • And from my pal Rebecca Klempner: some thoughts on National Novel-Writing Month (NaNoWriMo)—and what can be especially challenging about it for a Jewish writer. (This one is cross-posted over on the My Machberet blog, where you’ll find a fresh set of Jewish literary links shared today
  • Have a great weekend, everyone.

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    1. Thank you for the thought-provoking article on website inclusiveness. The hyperlink question is a tricky one. I try to include the full URL (at the bottom of the post if nowhere else) so the reference remains even if the link becomes somehow broken, but I don’t know how useful (or annoying) that is for folks who use a screen reader. I would love to hear what others think about this as well.

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