My Machberet

“Machberet” is the Hebrew word for notebook. Since it’s also (appropriately) one of the very first words I learned in my first Hebrew school in Brooklyn (and, until I returned to language study well into adulthood, one of the few conversational Hebrew words I still remembered), I’ve chosen it to title this blog, where I offer write-ups on Jewish news (especially of the literary sort) and occasional commentary.

Jewish Literary Links

an open book (with Hebrew pages visible); subtitle reads "Jewish Literary Links"
Image by Yedidia Klein from Pixabay

Toward the end of each week, the My Machberet blog presents a collection of links, drawn primarily from the world of Jewish books and writing.

  • In geveb, the online journal of Yiddish Studies, seeks a part-time (8-10 hours per week) Translations Editor to coordinate the Texts and Translation section for the 2021-2022 academic year, with the possibility to renew the contract in subsequent years.” Compensation: “$5,700 to $7,200 stipend, to be determined by the successful applicant’s time commitment and final responsibilities.” Apply by August 20.
  • J. The Jewish News of Northern California is hiring a part-time staff writer. “The position is 2-3 days per week, and you must live in the Bay Area.” Compensation: “$20,000 to $25,000.”
  • The New Zionist Congress Essay Contest has extended its deadline to July 16 (tomorrow).
  • Remember some of the less-than-pleasant news I shared last week from the world of Jewish kidlit? You may be interested in another take on that, from Jennifer Tzivia MacLeod.
  • Speaking of kidlit, here’s an event that PJ Library will offer next week: “Reading Between the Lines: Midrash as Inspiration for Children’s Books.” The (free!) session “will explore successful examples of midrash being integrated into Jewish children’s books. Participants will learn what midrash is and how and where to access it, understand how midrash can be effectively integrated into children’s picture books and middle-grade books, and meet authors who have successfully integrated ancient Jewish texts into their stories. Participants will leave with a resource list, including relevant children’s books and sources of midrash.”

Shabbat shalom.