Sunday Sentence

Another Sunday in which I participate in David Abrams’s “Sunday Sentence” project, which asks others to share the best sentence(s) we’ve read during the past week, “out of context and without commentary.” And another Sunday in which I cannot adhere to the instructions of “out of context and without commentary.” In fact, this week, I simply MUST provide some context and commentary. Because on this Sunday between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, the “best” sentences I’ve read lately come from the Holy Day prayerbook, from the Unetaneh Tokef poem/prayer.

A full-text translation can be found here. Leonard Cohen’s famous interpretation (also preceded by context & commentary!) is below. Some writing of mine inspired by the prayer’s lines has appeared on this site in the past. And as we approach the 40th anniversary of the Yom Kippur War, another powerful version, led by the Chief Cantor of the Israel Defense Forces, can be found here.

Sunday Sentence

Another Sunday in which I participate in David Abrams’s “Sunday Sentence” project, which asks others to share the best sentence(s) we’ve read during the past week, “out of context and without commentary.”
Unknown“One radio blended into another radio, the congregation around each car standing with heads bent like at a funeral, and when a person left the circle of listeners the solemn face would remain solemn, the bent head would remain bent, a solitary fighter walking into the ring but without the robe, without the name emblazoned across the back, just a New Yorker in work clothes, walking forward, but really these walks looked direction-less except everyone, everyone, was walking uptown.”

Source: Adam Berlin, The Number of Missing. (It seems that I really have difficulty with the “without commentary” part of the Sunday Sentence project; I am compelled to add that I read so many sentences that impressed me as Sunday Sentence-worthy in the advance reading copy I received.)

Sunday Sentence

Another Sunday in which I participate in David Abrams’s “Sunday Sentence” project, which asks others to share the best sentence(s) we’ve read during the past week, “out of context and without commentary.”
Golden-Retriever“This is what dogs teach us: to love and to risk losing and to love again. I’ve met people who never want another dog after losing their first one, and I’m sympathetic. But what if after our first heartbreak we gave up on love? What if after the first fight with a lover we shielded ourselves? We would be protected, yes, but we’d also be done living.”

Tatjana Soli, “Picking Up the Scent of Bliss”

Sunday Sentence

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Another Sunday in which I participate in David Abrams’s “Sunday Sentence” project, which asks others to share the best sentence(s) we’ve read during the past week, “out of context and without commentary.”

“Vienne la nuit sonne l’heure//Les jours s’en vont je demeure”

–Source: Guillaume Apollinaire’s “Le Pont Mirabeau,” which I revisited this week when @JenniferSolheim reminded me of this recording of the poet reading it aloud. Merveilleux! (I have a hard time with the “out of context and without commentary bit, as you can see!)

Sunday Sentence

veritas_logoAnother Sunday in which I participate in David Abrams’s “Sunday Sentence” project, which asks others to share the best sentence(s) we’ve read during the past week, “out of context and without commentary.”

“‘Your acceptance into Harvard is one of the shining accomplishments of my life,’ she said, ‘and I’ll be damned if I see you give it away.'”

Justin Porter’s essay in the latest issue of The New York Times‘s “Education Life” section.