Jewish Literary Links

an open book (with Hebrew pages visible); subtitle reads "Jewish Literary Links"
Image by Yedidia Klein from Pixabay

Toward the end of each week, the My Machberet blog presents a collection of links, drawn primarily from the world of Jewish books and writing.

  • In his latest J. column, Howard Freedman reviews two new short-story collections—one American (Veronica Schanoes’s Burning Girls and Other Short Stories) and one Israeli (Iddo Gefen’s Jerusalem Beach: Stories, in English translation by Daniella Zamir).
  • The October Jewish Book Carnival for October has gone live, hosted for the month by Barbara Bietz’s Jewish Books for Kids…and More!
  • Sefaria is looking for “a highly motivated, creative thinker to support our mission to make Jewish texts accessible and engaging for a diverse Hebrew speaking audience. The Hebrew Communications & Editorial Associate is a full-time, remote position based in Israel. This position provides key communications support for the team’s day-to-day operations in Israel as well as global projects and initiatives.” Note that the “priority deadline” for applications is October 31.
  • “On Netflix and elsewhere, new collections of Palestinian and Israeli films are now available for streaming”—so reports Andrew Lapin for JTA (with important details that temper my enthusiasm for last week’s news from from the Israel Film Archive).
  • There are some amazing archival discoveries (via the Forward) about David Duchovny’s paternal grandfather, Yiddish writer Moshe Duchovny, who died when the grandson was three months old. The Forward has written them up, but it was so moving to watch the grandson learn about the grandfather last night during the Forward‘s latest gala celebration (their segment begins @ 1:03:06).

Shabbat shalom.

an open book (with Hebrew pages visible); subtitle reads "Jewish Literary Links"

3 thoughts on “Jewish Literary Links

  1. Virginia Lee says:

    Gillian Polack, an award-winning Jewish author and scholar from Australia, is one of my favorite writers. I cannot recommend her works more highly. https://gillianpolack.com/my-books/

    1. Virginia Lee – Where should I start if I want to try Gillian Polack? I was awash looking at the list of her books.

      1. Virginia Lee says:

        My two fiction favorites are The Time of the Ghosts and The Wizardry of Jewish Women. Each stands alone very nicely. Life through Cellophane/Ms. Cellophane is the first of Polack’s I ever read and I was hooked. Her non-fiction work is brilliant also. Honestly, you can’t go wrong.

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