Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen
Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of Jewish literary news from around the Web.

  • On the occasion of the publication of Herman Wouk’s latest novel, Adam Kirsch revisits Wouk’s major writings and career.
  • A big thank-you to The Kenyon Review for posting audio of Elie Wiesel’s acceptance speech on November 8, when he received the 2012 Kenyon Review Award for Literary Achievement.
  • Paid, part-time internship opportunity with the Jewish Book Council in New York. Apply by December 17.
  • Further thoughts stemming from Philip Roth’s retirement announcement, from Jason Diamond and D.G. Myers.
  • Right after his November 15 reading at Baruch College, Etgar Keret headed home to Israel. Shortly thereafter, it seems, he wrote this.
  • This week was, again, a time when I (to paraphrase a rabbi friend) thought often of our cousins in the East. To stay informed, I relied extensively on The Times of Israel, Tablet, Jeffrey Goldberg, and the URJ’s Israel page.
  • Shabbat shalom to all. And special thanks to RJ.org for publishing my poem, “Questions for the Critics,” on Tuesday.

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen
    Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of Jewish literary news from around the Web.

  • Coming soon (as in: next Tuesday, November 20): the next meeting of the Jewish Book Council’s Twitter Book Club, featuring Shani Boianjiu and The People of Forever Are Not Afraid.
  • You’ve likely heard the news: Philip Roth is done with writing! Eitan Kensky reads the announcement more closely.
  • From Judy Bolton-Fasman: Q&A with Michael Lowenthal, whose latest novel, The Paternity Test, “gracefully merges gay marriage, Jewish identity, sexuality, the Holocaust, Jewish continuity and sexual fidelity in one story.”
  • Moment magazine has announced the topic for this year’s “Elephant in the Room” essay contest. Click here for details.
  • Glad to see that The Jewish Week’s “Well Versed” arts blog seems to be back.
  • Wishing everyone–especially in Israel–a Shabbat Shalom.

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen
    Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of Jewish literary news from around the Web.

  • This week I had the great pleasure of reading Jami Attenberg’s new novel, The Middlesteins (thank you, NetGalley!). I hope to write a full post about it at some point. Suffice to say that I recommend it highly. For now, I’ll point you to the ever-sage Adam Kirsch for a detailed review.
  • A reliably beautiful post from Richard Chess, writing about Michael Chabon, stories, Israel, and so much more.
  • The California-based Jewish Women’s Theatre seeks submissions for its “Culture Klatch”: “Be a part of this culture klatch by submitting your play, monologue, poem, essay, story, song, etc. to the Jewish Women’s Theatre. Material will be read in the JWT signature Salon Theatre with a professional cast.” (via the WomenArts Theatre Funding News)
  • Baltimore Jewish Times is advertising for a Senior Writer.
  • Forgive me if I’ve posted this before, but it seemed new to me when I read it this week: another profile in the press about JewishFiction.net, where I’ll have a piece appearing before too long.
  • Shabbat shalom.

    From My Bookshelf: Famous Drownings in Literary History, by Kevin Haworth

    Okay, Kevin Haworth’s latest book, an essay collection, isn’t on my physical bookshelf. But it is among my recent Kindle purchases. And I recommend it.

    I recommend it not only because, in the years since I interviewed him about his prize-winning novel, Kevin has become a friend and valued colleague in the arena of Jewish literary culture (even if we don’t always agree). I recommend it because Kevin is a talented writer whose nonfiction is at least as compelling as his fiction; because his is a voice worth knowing; and because his take on elements of Jewish identity in our time–whether he writes about the circumcision of his son, the culture of the Catskills, or what it’s like to leave Ben Gurion Airport just after the Israeli victims’ bodies have returned there from a terrorist attack in Bulgaria–should reach a wide audience.

    If you’d like a taste of the previously published essays that featured in this collection, may I recommend the one titled “The News from Bulgaria”? I suspect strongly that after you read it, you’ll want to learn more about Kevin and his book.

    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of Jewish literary news from around the Web.

  • First up: The Natan Award is an exciting new prize for a nonfiction book-in-progress. This award “brings Natan’s values of infusing Jewish life with creativity and meaning into the intellectual arena by supporting and promoting a breakthrough book on Jewish themes intended for mainstream audiences.” No entry fee. Applications due December 3.
  • The latest issue of Jewish Book World is now online, in its entirety.
  • Poet Gerald Stern is profiled in The Forward.
  • The Yiddish Book Center has announced a new Translation Fellowship Program for those with at least an intermediate-level proficiency in Yiddish. “Beginning in the winter of 2012, the Center will select five Translation Fellows who will receive yearlong mentorship and training to complete book-length projects in Yiddish translation. As an incentive to produce works of the highest caliber, each Fellow will receive a grant of $5,000.” There is no application fee. Application deadline is November 15, 2012.
  • Finally, I am delighted that my home congregation has added live-streamed services to its offerings. Now I can much more easily share something that’s so important to me with all of you. For example: our senior rabbi’s most recent Rosh Hashanah sermon, archived for everyone to absorb. Let’s just say that there was a lot I agreed with in what he said about Israel this year.
  • Shabbat shalom.