Friday Finds for Writers

Treasure ChestWriting-related resources, news, and reflections to read over the weekend.

  • Struggling to find your “voice” as a writer? Maybe you have more voices than you’ve realized. Thought-provoking essay by Pico Iyer.
  • Lots to think about in Kevin Young’s Virginia Quarterly Review essay “Blood Nation: Half-Breeds, Maids, Porterhouses, and the Fake Memoir.” But these may be my favorite lines: “My definition of creative non-fiction is simple. It is a radically subjective account of events that objectively took place. The moment you start making up events that you know did not take place, you’re doing another sort of work. It’s called fiction.”
  • Celeste Ng writes about the deeper value of Twitter for writers.
  • On the Ploughshares blog, Roxane Gay describes her teaching practice.
  • Choice quotations from Cynthia Ozick, to mark the author’s 85th birthday this week. (h/t @dg_myers)
  • Everyone, have a good, safe, restorative weekend. See you back here on Monday.

    Friday Finds for Writers

    Treasure ChestWriting-related resources, news, and reflections to read over the weekend.

  • It’s always a treat to receive Diane Lockward’s poetry newsletter. If you’re not a subscriber, I highly recommend that you become one! Here’s the latest (April) issue.
  • Not surprisingly, some of the more astute commentaries on Amazon’s acquisition of Goodreads have come from Steve Almond and Porter Anderson.
  • Speaking of Amazon: Do you think it should change its policy on Kindle book returns? I do, which is why I’ve signed the Change.org petition that Galleycat brought to my attention this week.
  • Acronyms decoded: pay terms for freelancers.
  • Congratulations to Kelly James-Enger on the launch of Improvise Press and the new edition of Six-Figure Freelancing (and special thanks to Kelly for the complimentary digital review copy that she offered me–I’m gobbling it up!).
  • Have a great weekend, everyone. See you back here on Monday!

    Friday Finds for Writers

    Treasure ChestWriting-related resources, news, and reflections to read over the weekend.

  • People have been talking this week about freelancer Nate Thayer’s post, “A Day in the Life of a Freelance Journalist.” You can read an example of the discussion here. See also Jane Friedman’s take on “The State of Online Journalism Today: Controversial.”
  • Also a popular topic (at least among the folks that I follow on Twitter): Alex Nazaryan’s confession regarding a certain “bitterness” in his book reviews. Julia Keller’s piece on “The Reviewer Reviewed” has attracted far less attention (at least as far as I can tell), but for me, it’s at least equally important and instructive for those of us who write reviews and criticism in addition to our “own” writing.
  • Amen, sister! That’s my response to Writer Abroad’s “9 Things Not to Do as a Writer.”
  • In case you haven’t heard, there’s a little event for writers taking place in Boston at the moment. And in case you can’t be there in person (I’m popping in for a grand total of 23 hours starting midday tomorrow), you can always follow the Tweets!
  • Have a great weekend everyone. See you back here on Monday.

    Friday Finds for Writers

    Treasure ChestWriting-related resources, news, and reflections to read over the weekend.

  • I agree that “said is NOT dead,” but I’m likely to cut other writers (and myself) a little more slack for dialogue tags. In other words, I won’t declare that “said” must be the tag of choice 99 percent of the time. 92 percent, maybe. I’m also a fan of tagless dialogue (as when it’s obvious who’s speaking).
  • Diane Lockward wonders if this writing scam might work on someone. (Let’s hope not!)
  • The Ploughshares blog rounds up some excellent advice on getting published.
  • Helpful hints for planning a virtual book tour.
  • A very good Twitter tutorial (aimed toward journalists, but I think that most of us can benefit).
  • Have a great weekend, all. See you back here on Monday.

    Friday Finds for Writers

    Treasure ChestWriting-related resources, news, and reflections to read over the weekend.

  • We can’t all be students in the University of Michigan’s MFA program, but thanks to Fiction Writers Review, we can get a sense of Colson Whitehead’s recent visit there.
  • From the Ploughshares blog: “If you want to get out of the slush pile, one of the worst things you can do is write a lackluster first paragraph.”
  • The Knight Foundation has apologized for paying plagiarist Jonah Lehrer a $20,000 speaking fee.
  • New and worthy reads on the horizon, courtesy of The Quivering Pen and Fiction Writers Review.
  • Finally, just slightly later than the rest of us, The New York Times has discovered Goodreads.
  • Have a great weekend, everyone. See you back here on Monday!