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Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen


Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • Coming this weekend: the Global Day of Jewish Learning, which kicks off with a 7 pm (U.S. Eastern time) online conversation with author Dara Horn on Saturday night.
  • Rebecca Klempner interviews Ruchama King Feuerman.
  • The Jewish Week‘s fall literary guide is now online.
  • On Wednesday morning, The Times of Israel told me that a book published by Scholastic had omitted Israel from a map of the Middle East. I was glad to see Scholastic respond quickly.
  • A follow-up to my earlier post on “Kristallnacht in Poetry & Prose.”
  • Shabbat shalom.

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    Kristallnacht in Poetry & Prose

    The shattered stained glass windows of the Zerrennerstrasse synagogue after its destruction on Kristallnacht. Pforzheim, Germany, ca. November 10, 1938. (USHMM/Stadtarchiv Pforzheim)

    The shattered stained glass windows of the Zerrennerstrasse synagogue after its destruction on Kristallnacht. Pforzheim, Germany, ca. November 10, 1938. (USHMM/Stadtarchiv Pforzheim)

     

    Kristallnacht, literally, “Night of Crystal,” is often referred to as the “Night of Broken Glass.” The name refers to the wave of violent anti-Jewish pogroms which took place on November 9 and 10, 1938, throughout Germany, annexed Austria, and in areas of the Sudetenland in Czechoslovakia recently occupied by German troops.”

    Kristallnacht figures as an essential turning point in Nazi Germany’s persecution of Jews, which culminated in the attempt to annihilate the European Jews.”

    Both of my paternal grandparents had arrived safely in the United States before the Kristallnacht of November 1938. And yet, among the stories my grandmother told over the years, the tale of how her parents and other loved ones back in Germany experienced the horrific events lodged in my mind and in my heart. Continue reading ›

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    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • Marjorie Ingall considers the plethora of poultry in new Jewish children’s books.
  • Over on The Whole Megillah, there’s an exciting announcement about the first “Whole Megillah Conference on Jewish Story,” scheduled for May 2014 and covering children’s writing, memoir, poetry, and fiction.
  • If you’ve got a blog post to contribute to the next Jewish Book Carnival, you have until Monday (November 11) to send it in to this month’s host. Details here.
  • I plan to take some time this weekend to peruse the latest issue of Blue Lyra Review, a journal whose self-described aim “is to bring together the voices of writers and artists from a diverse array of backgrounds, paying special homage to Jewish writers and other communities that are historically underrepresented in literary magazines.”
  • A reminder: This weekend marks the 75th anniversary of Kristallnacht. (Some of my own family history from that episode turns up in one of the stories in my collection Quiet Americans.)
  • Shabbat shalom.

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    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • There’s still time to enter this year’s Jewish Playwriting Contest. Read this update from the Jewish Plays Project.
  • New opportunity from the Schusterman Foundation: “#MakeItHappen invites YOU to show how small change can lead to big impact. Submit your inspired ideas for creating a Jewish experience that will make a meaningful difference in your community. Between October and December 2013, up to 50 ideas from around the world will be selected to receive a micro grant of up to $1,000. Five ideas could receive up to $5,000.” I’d love to see more literary-oriented ideas proposed!
  • A 90-year-old Holocaust survivor made his orchestral debut with renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma on Tuesday to benefit a foundation dedicated to preserving the work of artists and musicians killed by the Nazis.”
  • Grace Schulman has a new poetry collection out.
  • Via the daily Publishers Lunch newsletter, I learned this week that we can anticipate two new books from Etgar Keret: “THE SEVEN GOOD YEARS, a memoir in essays following the years between the birth of his son and the death of his father, and his next story collection.” Investigating further, here’s what I discovered about the former title. (If any of you have access to the full Publishers Lunch/Publishers Marketplace info, and can fill us in on exactly when we can expect those books to be published, I’d be grateful.)
  • Shabbat shalom.

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    Whose Gen-X Judaism?

    StarPeople are talking about “A Portrait of Jewish Americans: Findings from a Pew Research Center Survey of U.S. Jews.” I’ve tried to keep up with what they are saying, refraining, for the most part, from commenting. (There are many blessings that accompany having a full-time job; in my case, the luxury of focusing quickly, thoughtfully, and in writing on matters of great personal interest isn’t one of them.)

    So, over the past several days, I’ve read and listened to others. I’ve found myself agreeing with plenty that some commenters, including Rabbi David Wolpe and Jane Eisner, have had to say. But when I read Elissa Strauss’s “Give Us Our Gen-X Judaism,” disagreement—and a sense of depression—ensued.

    And this troubled me, not only because Strauss and I have had numerous agreeable exchanges in the past (even if we haven’t ever met face-to-face), but also because, unlike Wolpe or Eisner, I’m actually part of the cohort on whose behalf Strauss is ostensibly speaking, those “Gen Xers” who were born, as the Pew survey indicates, between 1965 and 1980. And “our” Gen-X Judaism, at least as outlined in Strauss’s post, is definitely not mine. Continue reading ›

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    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • If you’ve wondered how to introduce Anne Frank’s story to kids, you might want to check out this interview with Jane Kohuth, author of Anne Frank’s Chestnut Tree.
  • I’m hoping to spend part of this weekend watching a recording of “Women in Religious Texts and Contexts: New Voices in the Biographical Novel,” featuring Anita Diamant, Rebecca Kanner, and Sherry Jones.
  • Harvey Freedenberg reviews David Laskin’s The Family: Three Journeys into the Heart of the Twentieth Century.
  • Also instructive: David Horovitz’s conversation with Yossi Klein Halevi on the occasion of the latter’s Like Dreamers: The Story of the Israeli Paratroopers Who Reunited Jerusalem and Divided a Nation.
  • Learn more about author James Salter ( James Horowitz) in Rich Cohen’s Jewish Review of Books piece.
  • Shabbat shalom.

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