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Pre-Shabbat Jewish Literary Links

Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen


Every Friday My Machberet presents an array of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • A marvelous essay by Emily Meg Weinstein about her grandparents/family history.
  • A fascinating account of an epic Yiddish poem—about Kentucky—by Dara Horn.
  • On my viewing agenda: video from an event featuring Ruby Namdar and Liel Leibovitz in conversation about The Ruined House, Namdar’s Sapir Prize-winning novel (which is now available in an English translation by Hillel Halkin).
  • And on my listening agenda: the “grand finale” (for now, anyway) of the Book of Life podcast.
  • ICYMI: Jewish Book Carnival call for submissions.
  • Shabbat shalom!

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    Pre-Shabbat Jewish Literary Links

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday My Machberet presents an array of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • This week’s Israel in Translation podcast features poetry by Tuvia Ruebner, translated by Lisa Katz and Shahar Bram. Just beautiful.
  • I had reason the other day to refer someone to this resource page, which I designed for anyone seeking to publish Jewish-themed stories, poems, and essays. And it occurred to me that it had been a while since I’d mentioned that page here.
  • Terrific Tablet piece (by Jake Marmer) occasioned by the release of the film adaptation of André Aciman’s 2007 novel Call Me By Your Name.
  • From across the pond: “The longlist for the 2018 JQ (Jewish Quarterly) Wingate Prize has been announced, with “identity” singled out as this year’s overriding theme. Twelve books have been selected, including Judas by Amos Oz, Forest Dark by Nicole Krauss and The Dark Circle by Linda Grant. The prize, now in its 41st year, is run in association with the JW3 community centre. The winner of the £4,000 prize will be announced on February 15, 2018.”
  • And remember—you can win a copy of Leon Wiener Dow’s The Going: A Meditation on Jewish Law via this Goodreads giveaway. (If you’re interested in reviewing the book or otherwise profiling the author, please let me know!)
  • Shabbat shalom! And if you’ll be attending the Jewish Book Council’s Jewish Writers’ Seminar this weekend, please say hello!

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    Pre-Shabbat Jewish Literary Links

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday My Machberet presents an array of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • A treat from HevriaCast: an episode featuring Rachel Kann.
  • Over on the Library Journal site: “Israel in Fiction: Celebrate Jewish Book Month with These Titles by Israeli Authors,” a wonderful overview by Rachel Kamin.
  • Registration is now open for the Jewish Book Council’s Jewish Writers’ Seminar in New York. (I’ll be there!)
  • Via eJewish Philanthropy, I’ve discovered the intriguing Hewish Studio Project. Its Studio AM “is a new creative arts studio in the Bay Area that lifts up the creative potential in each person and offers an accessible, inspiring and creative pathway into Jewish connection and community.” Note an upcoming “immersive” event, to take place in January, for which applications are due November 20. (Partial scholarships may be available.)
  • And this week my the U.K.’s Jewish Chronicle published my latest “View from the U.S.A.” column. In this installment, I look back on where I was—and what I was thinking—one year ago.
  • Shabbat shalom.

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    Friday Finds for Writers


    Writing-related resources, news, and reflections to enjoy over the weekend. Continue reading ›

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    Pre-Shabbat Jewish Literary Links

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday My Machberet presents an array of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • Possibly my favorite HevriaCast episode thus far: Elad Nehorai in conversation with guest Amy Guterson, the founder and director of Tzohar, a Hasidic seminary for the arts.
  • “How Jewish Tradition Makes Its Way Into My Epic Fantasy Books”: interesting post by Noah Beit-Aharon on ReformJudaism.org.
  • “This past week I was fortunate to hear four gifted, articulate writers — two American and two North American-born who made aliyah many years ago. They described how, through their work, they grapple with their relationship with Israel, and how the complexities of the Israel-diaspora relationship — a reality made more urgent as the 50th anniversary of the Six-Day War nears —are reflected in their writing.” Read Gary Rosenblatt’s reflections after events that featured Bret Stephens, Yossi Klein Halevi, Matti Friedman, and Nicole Krauss.
  • Speaking of the anniversary of the Six-Day War: I have a poem that would be timely for publication in conjunction with that anniversary. Please contact me if you’re an editor who’d like to consider it.
  • And speaking of poems: Did you know about the one that argued against Norway’s constitutional ban on Jews? I didn’t—until I read about it on Tablet.
  • Shabbat shalom.

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    Pre-Shabbat Jewish Literary Links

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday My Machberet presents an array of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • Terrific tribute to Herman Wouk—who just turned 102—from Jeff Jacoby.
  • A beautiful piece for a Friday: “Marking God’s Time in Our Muslim and Orthodox Jewish Families,” by Saadia Faruqi and Shoshana Kordova, for Catapult.
  • A gift from across the pond: London’s Jewish Book Week festival archive.
  • ICYMI: big announcement about my work at Fig Tree Books over on my other blog.
  • “The Yiddish Book Center is accepting applications for a yearlong fellowship in development and fundraising. Fellows will gain hands-on, paid experience and professional training. The goal of the fellowship is to mentor the next generation of fundraising professionals interested in working in the Jewish cultural space.” Apply by July 1.
  • Shabbat shalom, everyone. And chag sameach.

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