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Words of the Week

“The JVP call for a flat right of return where the legitimate Palestinian leadership has accepted compromise is one example among many of how the Palestinian solidarity movement in the diaspora has cut loose from the actual Palestinian national movement and hitched itself to the extremist Palestinian opposition. Another is the frequent attack by pro-Palestinian activists on Israel’s right to exist, something the Palestinian leadership has formally recognized at least since 1993.”

Source: J.J. Goldberg, “The One Weird Thing That Birthright And JVP Have In Common” (Forward)

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Pre-Shabbat Jewish Literary Links

Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

Every Friday My Machberet presents an array of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • Other Covenants, the first-ever anthology of Jewish alternate history, to be published by ChiZine Publications in Fall 2019,” seeks submissions. (via Selene MacLeod)
  • The Jewish Advocate (Boston) is hiring a reporter.
  • And in Los Angeles, there’s a job opportunity for a PJ Library Program Manager.
  • I was so excited to discover Ben Yehuda Press’s new emphasis on Jewish poetry that I had to immediately support their Kickstarter project.
  • Finally: a hearty mazal tov to Bethany Ball, whose What to Do About the Solomons was recently shortlisted for the Center for Fiction’s First Novel Prize.
  • Shabbat shalom!

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    Pre-Shabbat Jewish Literary Links

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday My Machberet presents an array of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • “The Promise of Israel’s New Orthodox Cinema”—informative piece by Benjamin Kerstein for Mosaic.
  • “The Hadassah-Brandeis Institute awards grants to support research or artistic projects on Jewish women’s and gender issues across a range of disciplines.” And now is the time to apply for the current round.
  • If you haven’t begun seeing the press about Nicole Krauss’s new novel, you’ll likely soon be noticing it. See, for example, Erica Wagner’s profile of Krauss for The Guardian.
  • Attention, David Grossman fans: check out the Israeli author’s new song-cycle on a site with Hebrew, Arabic, and English text. (Background info on Tablet.)
  • And you’ve got about one week left to enter this Goodreads giveaway for an chance to win the first volume of Rabbi Shai Held’s The Heart of Torah: Essays on the Weekly Torah Portion.
  • Shabbat shalom.

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    Words of the Week

    “We’re not asking for special treatment or an exemption from criticism. We just want to be treated like any other marginalized group — with dignity and kindness, and with the real promise to stand in solidarity with us even when that requires hard work.”

    Source: Mirah Curzer, “Does Your Progressivism Include Jews? Or, How to Criticize Israel Without Being Anti-Semitic”

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    Pre-Shabbat Jewish Literary Links

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday My Machberet presents an array of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • On the “contributions to Israeli literature of writers writing in languages other than Hebrew.”
  • It’s time for the Jewish Book Carnival (hosted for August by Yael Shahar).
  • A review of Sons and Soldiers: The Untold Story of the Jews Who Escaped the Nazis and Returned with the U.S. Army to Fight Hitler.
  • Job alert (New York): Hadassah is looking for a Social Media Specialist.
  • There’s obviously been a lot of writing about what happened in Charlottesville last weekend—and its aftermath. Rather than post some of the items that have resonated most with me, I invite you to share some of the readings that you have found most powerful.
  • Shabbat shalom.

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    Words of the Week

    “The lesson I learned in Charlottesville was simple: when the racist- neo-Nazi- ‘alt-right’ gathers in your backyard, it is up to us to SHOW UP and make it known that they are not welcome. There is no room here to be passive. If we do not speak out and speak up now, the consequences can be even more devastating than what has already taken place.

    Hineni– I am present. You should be too.”

    Source: Shoshanna R. Schechter-Shaffin, “Charlottesville 2017: When the Nazis Come to Your Backyard – It is time to SHOW UP” (eJewish Philanthropy)

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