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Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • Happening May 11-13 at Bar-Ilan University: International Creative Writing Conference – Second Site: Displacement, Revelation. Free and open to the public. (via Israel Association of Writers in English)
  • Happening next Tuesday (May 6) here in New York: “Love in a Time of Conflict: Contemporary Fiction Set in Jerusalem,” billed as “an evening of readings and discussion with two award-winning authors, Ruchama King Feuerman and Yael Unterman.” NB: “Entrance $25 (min.)—$35 (recommended).” Fee includes signed copy of both books.
  • Writing contest for high-schoolers. “The Norman E. Alexander Award for Excellence in Jewish Student Writing is seeking essays on the American Jew the writer most admires and who has made significant contributions to humanitarian causes, social justice, medicine or science. The contest subject relates to the 2014 theme of American Jewish Heritage Month, ‘American Jews and Tikkun Olam, Healing the World.’”
  • “JTA, the global Jewish news service, is looking to hire summer and fall editorial interns in our New York City office. The editorial interns will perform various editorial tasks, including writing and reporting news and feature articles, as well as work related to our website and newsletter products.” This is a paid opportunity.
  • Rebecca Klempner interviews Tzvia Ehrlich-Klein, author of I Live with My Mommy, “a new, groundbreaking picture book [that] for the first time focuses on growing up in a single-parent, Orthodox Jewish home.”
  • Shabbat shalom.

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    Words of the Week: Bernard Malamud

    Malamud“I’m an American, I’m a Jew, and I write for all men. A novelist has to, or he’s built himself a cage. I write about Jews, when I write about Jews, because they set my imagination going. I know something about their history, the quality of their experience and belief, and of their literature, though not as much as I would like. Like many writers I’m influenced especially by the Bible, both Testaments. I respond in particular to the East European immigrants of my father’s and mother’s generation; many of them were Jews of the Pale as described by the classic Yiddish writers. And of course I’ve been deeply moved by the Jews of the concentration camps, and the refugees wandering from nowhere to nowhere. I’m concerned about Israel. Nevertheless, Jews like rabbis Kahane and Korff set my teeth on edge. Sometimes I make characters Jewish because I think I will understand them better as people, not because I am out to prove anything. That’s a qualification. Still another is that I know that, as a writer, I’ve been influenced by Hawthorne, James, Mark Twain, Hemingway, more than I have been by Sholem Aleichem and I. L. Peretz, whom I read with pleasure. Of course I admire and have been moved by other writers, Dostoyevsky and Chekhov, for instance, but the point I’m making is that I was born in America and respond, in American life, to more than Jewish experience. I wrote for those who read.”

    Source: Bernard Malamud’s 1974 “Art of Fiction” interview in The Paris Review. (Thanks to Kyle Minor for bringing this to my attention on Twitter this past weekend, which marked the 100th anniversary of Malamud’s birth.)

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    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • Ellis Shuman reviews Nora Gold’s new novel about anti-Israelism in academe, Fields of Exile, for The Times of Israel. (We’ll have a Q&A with Nora Gold about the novel here on My Machberet next month.)
  • Aaron David Miller’s take on Lawrence Wright’s “Camp David” makes me wish that I could see the play myself.
  • Tablet introduces us to Israeli poet Vaan Nguyen.
  • Fascinating essay-review by Cynthia Ozick on “How Kafka Actually Lived.” (h/t Mosaic Magazine)
  • From Jewish Literary Journal: “We are proud to announce that we are holding a 1-year anniversary competition on the theme of “Creation/Building.” Entering is Free. There will be 1 winner each in Fiction, Poetry, and Creative Non-Fiction, with a $50 prize per winner to be paid through Amazon Payments. The submission period is April 15-June 15 and winners will be published in issue 13, publishing July 1st. The Editors of the JLJ will decide who wins.”
  • Shabbat shalom.

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    Words of the Week: Jen Psaki

    “’Any Palestinian government must unambiguously and explicitly commit to nonviolence, recognition of the state of Israel, and acceptance of previous agreements and obligations between the parties,’ Ms. Psaki said, citing conditions Hamas has repeatedly rejected. ‘It’s hard to see how Israel can be expected to negotiate with a government that does not believe in its right to exist.’”

    Source: Jen Psaki, spokeswoman for U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, quoted in The New York Times

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    Jewish Literary Links for Shabbat

    Photo Credit: Reut Miryam Cohen

    Every Friday morning My Machberet presents an assortment of Jewish-interest links, primarily of the literary variety.

  • In The Barnes & Noble Review: an interview with Israeli author David Grossman about his newly translated book Falling out of Time.
  • I haven’t wanted to spend my precious reading time with John B. Judis’s Genesis: Truman, American Jews, and the Origins of the Arab/Israeli Conflict. Here’s another review that explains why that’s the case.
  • From Tablet: “Second Seder,” a Passover poem by Andrea Cohen.
  • Catch up with the monthly Jewish Book Carnival: April’s edition is hosted by The Whole Megillah.
  • LABA, “a non-religious Jewish house of study and culture laboratory at the 14th Street Y” in New York, has issued a call for fellowship applications. Next year’s theme: “TIME.” No fee to apply. Deadline: May 12, 2014. The program awards stipends to its fellows.
  • Shabbat shalom.

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