Words of the Week

Facebook post from Deborah Lipstadt, including photograph of her on stage at the URJ Biennial in Chicago and the following text: I am so deeply honored and touched by the response to my message. “I can’t answer everyone but clearly Jews are gratified to be reminded that we are so much more than victims. We are a people with an ancient, yet modern, tradition that has given so much to the world. Spread the word. That’s how we defeat the haters.”

(Thanks to Joanne Intrator for leading me to this.)

Jewish Book Carnival: December 2019

The My Machberet blog is proud to serve as December 2019 host for the Jewish Book Carnival, a monthly event where those who cover Jewish books online “can meet, read, and comment on each others’ posts.” Organized by the Association of Jewish Libraries, the Carnival travels around and is hosted on a different participant’s site on the 15th of each month.

stack of books and text announcing "Jewish Book Carnival, the 15th of each month, www.jewishlibraries.org/blog")

Herewith, the December 2019 Jewish Book Carnival:

(more…)

Words of the Week

When we ask God to remember the souls of our departed at Yizkor, we request more than a mere mental act. We pray implicitly that by focusing on our loved ones’ souls, God will take action on their behalf and save them from whatever pain they may be suffering, wherever they may be. At the same time, the implication is that this act of remembrance also constitutes a guarantee of Jewish community—well beyond just those we remember, and far beyond us as well. In remembering and in asking for God’s remembrance, we request divine help in continuing our people’s trajectory beyond ourselves, to achieve the ultimate aims of our people’s history. Yizkor is, in the end, not a prayer for the dead, but a promise by the living.

Source: Rabbi Aaron Panken (z”l).

(more…)